Main Menu

Dr. Conspiracy’s secret shame

They say confession is good for the soul. I voted in the Republican Primary today.

When they asked me at the polling place which primary I wanted to vote in, I said: “I’m going to hold my nose and vote Republican.”

I had my reasons.

23 Responses to Dr. Conspiracy’s secret shame

  1. avatar
    JM June 8, 2010 at 7:55 pm #

    Tell us why.

  2. avatar
    YellowDog June 8, 2010 at 7:56 pm #

    Honesty is the best policy. Here’s another cliche. Admitting you have a problem is the first step toward solving it.

  3. avatar
    Sef June 8, 2010 at 8:03 pm #

    At least there’s a cure.

  4. avatar
    sarina June 8, 2010 at 8:10 pm #

    I used to be a Republican ( but I never voted for Bush )

    I voted for Obama because I thought he was the best candidate and I still think he is.

    ( It was him or McCain, and I didn’t like McCain)

    Doc, I don’t know you personally but you seem to be a honest and good

    person and if you were running for major or something else in my city ( I live in Tampa)

    I’ll vote for you. We need honest polititians!! That’s what we need!!

  5. avatar
    sarina June 8, 2010 at 8:13 pm #

    I’m asking for an impossible right?

  6. avatar
    Estiveo June 8, 2010 at 8:28 pm #

    Me too, also. And I voted for Dunn. (Orly, if you want to which of your flying monkeys lost you my vote…call, me grrl friend.)

  7. avatar
    bob June 8, 2010 at 8:57 pm #

    I voted republican. And for Taitz!

  8. avatar
    Scott Brown June 8, 2010 at 9:09 pm #

    I held my nose and voted Democrat – because I wanted the weaker Dem to win, so the Republican can win in the General….I’m guessing your reason was similar.

    Happens all the time.

  9. avatar
    Dr. Conspiracy June 8, 2010 at 9:10 pm #

    JM Tell us why.

    I live in South Carolina. The only chance I get to influence the general election is to vote in the Republican primary.

  10. avatar
    Arthur June 8, 2010 at 9:17 pm #

    South Carolina . . . beautiful state, nice people, but some seriously weird politicians.

  11. avatar
    Dr. Kenneth Noisewater (Bob Ross) June 8, 2010 at 9:21 pm #

    Scott Brown: I held my nose and voted Democrat – because I wanted the weaker Dem to win, so the Republican can win in the General….I’m guessing your reason was similar.Happens all the time.

    Yeah because democrats so have a chance in South Carolina.

  12. avatar
    G June 8, 2010 at 10:12 pm #

    Scott Brown: I held my nose and voted Democrat – because I wanted the weaker Dem to win, so the Republican can win in the General….I’m guessing your reason was similar.

    Happens all the time.

    Typical. That is what I would expect of someone like you.

    There is a total pattern here for you, isn’t there “Scott Brown”?. You are a fake who constantly portrays themselves as someone they are not and their past as something other than it was. All of your posts and your concerns come across fake and disingenuous and with malicious intent to spread misinformation and cause disruption.

    Your whole voting strategy just belies more of the same and reflects further on your personal character. You have no shame, do you? I personally couldn’t look at myself in the mirror every day if I exhibited the lack of moral character that you demonstrate here on a regular basis. I really don’t know how people like you and other con artists can act without a conscience.

  13. avatar
    misha June 8, 2010 at 10:42 pm #

    Arthur: South Carolina . . . beautiful state, nice people, but some seriously weird politicians.

    The state gave us Reuben Greenberg, so they’re good in my book. It makes up for the nuttiness.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reuben_Greenberg

  14. avatar
    SFJeff June 9, 2010 at 12:11 am #

    My wife is from Charleston, and I love South Carolina. All I have to contribute.

    If I could have voted in the Republican primary I would have voted for Tom Campbell- a good fiscal conservative and a reasonable social moderate. And just to be able to contribute to voting for a non-multi millionaire.

    On the plus side, this election has contributed over 200 million dollars in advertising dollars to the California economy

  15. avatar
    Mike June 9, 2010 at 5:49 pm #

    “I’m going to hold my nose and vote Republican.”

    I can see you as a Rockefeller Republican, Doc.

  16. avatar
    Passerby June 9, 2010 at 6:56 pm #

    I have no party loyalty at all, I guess. I change my party registration at will, to vote in whichever primary I think is most important that year (in my state, they’ll give you whichever ballot you ask for, but it changes your registration to that party.) I believe I’m currently a Democrat, but that may change. I might get around to changing it back to Indy before the next election. Or I might not.

  17. avatar
    G June 9, 2010 at 8:58 pm #

    Passerby: I have no party loyalty at all, I guess. I change my party registration at will, to vote in whichever primary I think is most important that year (in my state, they’ll give you whichever ballot you ask for, but it changes your registration to that party.) I believe I’m currently a Democrat, but that may change. I might get around to changing it back to Indy before the next election. Or I might not.

    Same here.

    Ohio requires you to register with a party to vote in the primaries. So I’ve had to register with a party at times to participate and therefore, I’ve been a member of both major parties in the past.

    I only do so when when I wish to express a desire for a candidate I *want* to vote for or to cast a vote for what I consider the “lesser of evils”. In either case, I am always casting a vote for someone I wish to see have a chance at being elected in the fall.

    I personally dislike the tactic of voting for a weak opposition opponent, just to help your opponent in the general. Quite a few here have mentioned.doing that. Personally, I don’t like it at all. In my view, I’d rather have two strong good candidates run against each other than just help the candidate you want run against a weak disaster. But that is just personal opinion and as a pragmatic, I completely understand why parties want to be in the strongest position and have the easiest path to victory.

  18. avatar
    G June 10, 2010 at 3:04 pm #

    Um Doc C., didn’t you say you live in Alabama?

    Their primary was the week prior, on June 1st.

    So, when you post this blog topic, with your statement on June 8th, “They say confession is good for the soul. I voted in the Republican Primary today.”

    What gives??? Care to explain?

  19. avatar
    Dr. Conspiracy June 10, 2010 at 7:22 pm #

    G: Um Doc C., didn’t you say you live in Alabama?

    No, I was born in Alabama, but I moved to South Carolina many years ago.

  20. avatar
    G June 10, 2010 at 8:10 pm #

    So, since you did the GOP primary, I take it you’ll be voting again during the 6/22 runoff?

    While I’m at it, are you willing to reveal which race(s) there made you decide to vote on that side of the ticket?

  21. avatar
    Passerby June 13, 2010 at 7:51 am #

    G: Same here.

    Ohio requires you to register with a party to vote in the primaries. So I’ve had to register with a party at times to participate and therefore, I’ve been a member of both major parties in the past.

    I’m actually in Ohio too. How about that.

    You don’t have to register with a party prior to voting in the primary. It’s just that by voting in a party’s primary, you declare yourself as a member of that party. That’s my understanding, anyway.

    I don’t vote in every primary. It’s usually because I have some strong preference. Either there’s someone I really like, and I want to vote for them; or there’s someone I really don’t like, and I want to vote against them; or there’s someone I really don’t like who looks like they’re going to win in a landslide, and the other party has a competitive primary, and I want to vote for the person I think has the best chance of beating the one I don’t like. So it’s strategic voting, kind of. I don’t think it’s the kind you object to, though.

  22. avatar
    G June 13, 2010 at 3:16 pm #

    Passerby – Yes, you are correct to clarify, in Ohio party registration takes place on Primary Day and each year, if you go to vote in that Primary, you can designate your registration.

    What I like about Ohio’s voting system is at least the dates are fairly stable – the 1st Tuesday in May is always our primary and the 1st Tuesday in Nov is always our general. Here and there there are local special elections thrown in between – usually school levy’s being snuck in while the snowbirds are wintering in FL and such.

    I try to never miss any election if I can. There are usually a fair amount of local and even state ballot issues even in off year May primaries. As anyone can vote on the non-partisan stuff, I usually don’t bother to change my registration from year to year unless I see a need of a person or slate that I’m more interested in being involved in voting.

  23. avatar
    Sef June 13, 2010 at 3:34 pm #

    In New York you must be a member of a party to vote in that party’s primary (or caucus). A person need not be a member of any party to vote in the general. A party affiliation change does not become effective until after the next general. This is to prevent party jumping just to vote in a primary or caucus. When I have participated in voter registration activities I am surprised at the number of people who think that if you are registered as a certain party member then you must vote for someone in that party in the general.