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Russians jump on Birther Bandwagon

Mark McGrew1, former correspondent for the old Soviet newspaper Pravda,  is in the vanguard of a new movement for Russians, the Rozhdensky movement. Rozhdenskys express anti-American sentiment by claiming that the Amerikansky regime is not legitimate. Similar-thinking persons in the United States are called “birthers.”

McGrew in his 31/01/2012 article entitled Obama the Chicken is Being Plucked denigrates everything American before attacking Obama individually and praising certain American anti-democratic dissidents. He wrote:

The amazingly tenacious, Carl Swensson, fighting to get Obama out of the office of the President, by knocking on every official’s door he could find for four years, finally found two government employees who were not traitors and took their Oath of Office seriously: The Georgia Secretary of State, Brian Kemp and Deputy Chief Judge Michael Malihi of the Georgia Office of Administrative Hearings.

Comrade McGrew is well schooled in Soviet-style propaganda techniques as evidenced by his article.


1As far as I know, McGrew has no real ties to Russia. However, I stand by my remark that “McGrew is well schooled in Soviet-style propaganda techniques.”

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10 Responses to Russians jump on Birther Bandwagon

  1. avatar
    Majority Will January 31, 2012 at 6:01 pm #

    С волка́ми жить, по-во́лчьи выть.

  2. avatar
    J. Potter January 31, 2012 at 6:08 pm #

    I see the Soviet Encyclopedia is still taking contributions!

    Judging by the quality of the links being offered, English Pravda is every bit as serious and respectable as WND is. Loaded with pop conspiracies and mental cotton candy!

  3. avatar
    Capitalist Scientist January 31, 2012 at 6:10 pm #

    Birthers are commies. So is John Drew.

  4. avatar
    donna January 31, 2012 at 6:17 pm #

    can we now refer to soviet born tatiz as “comrade”?

  5. avatar
    G January 31, 2012 at 6:22 pm #

    This online Pravda has been one of the main schlock havens of tabloid Birtherism since Birtherism began. Nothing new here. That’s like accusing Canada for the “Canadian Free Press”. Same schlock there too.

  6. avatar
    Paul Pieniezny January 31, 2012 at 8:04 pm #

    We have to be careful here.

    Actually, as the wikipedia article on Pravda explains, apart from an occasional journalist who used to work for the original newspaper (I doubt McCgrew was one of them), there is no relationship between the online Pravda and the Pravda newspaper, which the communists got back in 1997. (The real heir to pre-1991 Pravda is probably now the Komsomolskaya Pravda, who have the copyright to the Lenin medals.)

    The online version is right-wing and nationalist, and “sensational”, which in Russia means worse than the National Enquirer, with stories about Russian cosmonauts on Mars thirty years ago, women who were pregnant for fifty years and so on. Do not believe that a story about Obama not really being American is going to make a lot of waves.

    Argumenty i Fakty used to be an “interesting” newspaper for those interested in real news, even though it was really old news. It too has become more sensationalist. I think some reader once asked them whether Obama was really an American. The verdict of the AiF experts: not proven.

    How the mighty have fallen…

  7. avatar
    ASK Esq January 31, 2012 at 10:43 pm #

    Well, during the cold war, the joke was that Pravda, which means “truth,” as the official voice of the Soviet government, never printed the truth.

    So the online version seems to be carrying on that legacy, at least.

  8. avatar
    Dr. Conspiracy January 31, 2012 at 11:38 pm #

    The only thing serious in the article is the last line of the footnote.

  9. avatar
    katahdin February 1, 2012 at 11:56 am #

    Don’t mention that guy’s name. He’ll show up and start his usual bleating about “young Obama.”

    Capitalist Scientist:
    Birthers are commies.So is John Drew.

  10. avatar
    Keith February 2, 2012 at 4:35 am #

    ASK Esq:
    Well, during the cold war, the joke was that Pravda, which means “truth,” as the official voice of the Soviet government, never printed the truth.

    So the online version seems to be carrying on that legacy, at least.

    And Izvestia, which means “news”, never printed any news