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Selective Service confirms: records not destroyed

In a letter to Mike Zullo dated May 10, Richard S. Flahavan, Associate Director for Public and Intergovernmental, confirms that original copies of Selective Service registrations (the “record copy”) on microfilm are maintained in a secure facility, as well as a working copy. A computer database is also maintained for registrants born after January 1, 1960.

We’ve seen images of the microfilm registration form, and a screen shot from the computer system obtained in 2008 for Barack Obama.

In what appears to be a jab at the Cold Case Posse, Flahavan said:

…access is available to law enforcement organizations with Federal jurisdiction that are conducting an authorized Federal investigation.

I.e., “not you, buddy.”

The inquiry that prompted this letter is based an a birther’s silly reading of a Federal regulation that permitted destruction of non-record copies of registrations that weren’t needed any more. See my article: “Obama’s draft registration: conspiracies simmer”.

2012-05-10 – Letter – SSS to Zullo – Flahavan

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17 Responses to Selective Service confirms: records not destroyed

  1. avatar
    agent50 May 21, 2012 at 4:24 pm #

    Letter from SSA to Michael Zullo

    http://www.scribd.com/doc/94038426/2012-05-10-Letter-SSS-to-Zullo-Flahavan

    PS: I don’t know where else on this site to post this type of information or if it is proper
    board etiquette to even do so.

    [Moved to this new article. Thanks. Doc.]

  2. avatar
    donna May 21, 2012 at 5:15 pm #

    i guess arpaio and his frozen posse should that their (bogus) findings to the feds and DEMAND they begin a federal investigation

  3. avatar
    donna May 21, 2012 at 5:30 pm #

    romney’s selective service records:

    http://www.buzzfeed.com/andrewkaczynski/mitt-romney-selective-service-record

  4. avatar
    Rickey May 21, 2012 at 7:51 pm #

    donna:
    romney’s selective service records:

    http://www.buzzfeed.com/andrewkaczynski/mitt-romney-selective-service-record

    The deferments for Mormon missionaries were fairly controversial during the Vietnam War (for one thing, these divinity deferments disproportionately went to residents of Utah). In Romney’s case, he graduated high school in 1965 at the age of 18. He received a student deferment for this freshman year at Stanford, and then received a divinity deferment for a 30-month missionary stint in France. He returned to the U.S. around January, 1969 and received another student deferment when he enrolled at Brigham Young in February. If the draft lottery had not been instituted, he would have continued to receive student deferments until he graduated. If he had maintained a standard load of classes, he would have been on track to graduate in January, 1972. In effect he would have received seven years of deferments, effectively exempting himself from the draft for almost all of the most intense fighting of the war.

    The first draft lottery was held on December 1, 1969 and Romney lucked out when his date of birth came up #300.

  5. avatar
    Jim May 21, 2012 at 8:54 pm #

    Rickey: The deferments for Mormon missionaries were fairly controversial during the Vietnam War (for one thing, these divinity deferments disproportionately went to residents of Utah).

    I was just a child back then, but deferments were a bad thing all around, iirc.

  6. avatar
    Rickey May 21, 2012 at 10:15 pm #

    Jim: I was just a child back then, but deferments were a bad thing all around, iirc.

    There was an infamous college in Iowa – Parsons College – which was dubbed “Dropout University” because it accepted anyone who could come up with the tuition. If you flunked out of another college, you could keep your deferment by enrolling at Parsons.

  7. avatar
    Stephen May 21, 2012 at 10:21 pm #

    I also graduated in 1965. I was 17 then and not quite ready for college so I worked for a year, turning 18 during that time. Then in the fall of ’66 I entered college at age 18 along w/all those other freshmen of the same age. My draft board refused to grant me a deferment as a student because I wasn’t “going to finish college within 4 years of high school graduation.” All my freshman year I waited for the draft notice to arrive in my mailbox. Deferments were never issued in an even-handed way.

  8. avatar
    Jim May 21, 2012 at 10:30 pm #

    Stephen:
    Deferments were never issued in an even-handed way.

    My memory was if you knew someone (political) or had money you got deferred, no problem…as much as necessary to keep you out. Growing up on a major university campus, I got the feeling it was more about protesting to avoid being drafted than the war. They knew they were running out of deferments and already had buddies that were there. I turned 12 in ’69, so maybe it was just through a child’s eye.

  9. avatar
    richCares May 21, 2012 at 10:44 pm #

    I Graduated HS at 17 and immediately joined the US Marines, I served 3 yrs active duty then 3 yrs reserve. While in the reserve I started University of Hawaii. I applied for a student loan which was denied since I never registered for the draft. So I registered and finally got the loan at 21 yrs of age, I thought that was silly.

  10. avatar
    linda May 21, 2012 at 11:00 pm #

    I love it! In paragraph (c), the CCP gets the big F-U from the Selective Service. “However, access is available to authorized law enforcement organizations with Federal jurisdiction that are conducting an authorized Federal investigation.”

    Bless their heart.

  11. avatar
    Rickey May 22, 2012 at 12:07 am #

    richCares:
    IGraduated HS at 17 and immediately joined the US Marines, I served 3 yrs active duty then 3 yrs reserve. While in the reserve I started University of Hawaii. I applied for a student loan which was denied since I never registered for the draft. So I registered and finally got the loan at 21 yrs of age, I thought that was silly.

    I turned 18 while a senior in high school, so I registered then. I was sick of school so I decided to join the Navy after graduation. Within a week or so I was reclassified 1A and I went over to see the Navy recruiter. He signed me up on the spot and I was put in the inactive reserves because they had no openings in boot camp for six months. The recruiter gave me a document to send to the draft board when I received my induction notice, which arrived shortly thereafter.

    I spent six months as a civilian in the inactive reserves and went to boot camp in January. I was on active duty for four years and then did another 18 months in the inactive reserves.

  12. avatar
    Lupin May 22, 2012 at 5:09 am #

    Rickey: and then received a divinity deferment for a 30-month missionary stint in France.

    Evangelizing les petites mademoiselles in Pigalle, no doubt.

  13. avatar
    Sef May 22, 2012 at 12:58 pm #

    Rickey: The deferments for Mormon missionaries were fairly controversial during the Vietnam War (for one thing, these divinity deferments disproportionately went to residents of Utah). In Romney’s case, he graduated high school in 1965 at the age of 18. He received a student deferment for this freshman year at Stanford, and then received a divinity deferment for a 30-month missionary stint in France. He returned to the U.S. around January, 1969 and received another student deferment when he enrolled at Brigham Young in February. If the draft lottery had not been instituted, he would have continued to receive student deferments until he graduated. If he had maintained a standard load of classes, he would have been on track to graduate in January, 1972. In effect he would have received seven years of deferments, effectively exempting himself from the draft for almost all of the most intense fighting of the war.

    The first draft lottery was held on December 1, 1969 and Romney lucked out when his date of birth came up #300.

    I see Mittens didn’t have the foresight to come up with a reason for a 1-F.

  14. avatar
    Keith May 22, 2012 at 3:40 pm #

    Jim: My memory was if you knew someone (political) or had money you got deferred, no problem…as much as necessary to keep you out.Growing up on a major university campus, I got the feeling it was more about protesting to avoid being drafted than the war.They knew they were running out of deferments and already had buddies that were there.I turned 12 in ’69, so maybe it was just through a child’s eye.

    You and I have a different view. I was older than you, and ‘was there’. I graduated in 69, and had no problem getting a student deferment. However I was really stupid and didn’t reapply for the deferment for my sophomore year and was reclassified 1A. I was very very interested in the lottery, the second one to be held. I was somewhere just over 300 IIRC.

    My period of eligibility was during a rather odd time in the history of drafting. Congress let the authority to draft expire for 4 months, but the eligibility clock kept counting. So for the first 4 months of my eligibility they couldn’t draft anyone at all, and for the final 2 months of eligibility they couldn’t possibly draft enough people to get to me.

    Protesting the War in Viet Nam was not about ‘running out of deferments’. Kent State proved without a doubt that you could be killed on a College Campus; you didn’t have to go to Khe San to get shot.

    Deferments weren’t ‘limited’. You stayed in school, and reapply like I didn’t, and you got a deferment. Sure, if you knew somebody you could get a deferment without going to school. You could have a bum leg or any number of other ‘afflictions’, or be a homosexual and get a deferment. You could also move to Canada. There were many options. Conscientious Objector was difficult to get though.

  15. avatar
    Rickey May 22, 2012 at 4:02 pm #

    Keith:

    Deferments weren’t ‘limited’. You stayed in school, and reapply like I didn’t, and you got a deferment. Sure, if you knew somebody you could get a deferment without going to school. You could have a bum leg or any number of other ‘afflictions’, or be a homosexual and get a deferment. You could also move to Canada. There were many options. Conscientious Objector was difficult to get though.

    And we all heard stories about men chopping off a toe to get classified 4-F. What many didn’t realize is that they could have gotten medical deferments simply by gaining weight. I seem to recall that the cutoff weight for a six-foot man was about 225 pounds. Balloon up to 240 or so and you would flunk your physical. Others learned tricks to temporarily raise their blood pressure to unacceptable levels.

    Many, like me, decided to enlist rather than be drafted into the Army.

  16. avatar
    Dr. Conspiracy May 22, 2012 at 4:17 pm #

    I’m a year older. I was 2-S for two years and then had high lottery numbers. If I got drafted I would have served, arguing that somebody was going, and it might as well be me, no matter what I thought about the war.

    Keith: You and I have a different view. I was older than you, and ‘was there’. I graduated in 69, and had no problem getting a student deferment. However I was really stupid and didn’t reapply for the deferment for my sophomore year and was reclassified 1A. I was very very interested in the lottery, the second one to be held. I was somewhere just over 300 IIRC.

  17. avatar
    Dr. Conspiracy May 22, 2012 at 4:19 pm #

    I had a friend who was a CO. He did community service driving an ambulance in Atlanta where he probably saw as much bloodshed as he would have in Vietnam.

    Keith: Conscientious Objector was difficult to get though.