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Blog technical difficulties

The blog is having technical difficulties with the Internet Explorer 9 browser, resulting in articles with quotations having part of the text obscured by huge quotation marks.

Please use the Firefox or Google Chrome browsers until this is fixed (and this article is deleted).

To download Firefox visit Mozilla.org. Sorry for this temporary inconvenience.

Update:

This has been temporarily resolved by removing the quotes altogether.

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25 Responses to Blog technical difficulties

  1. avatar
    Majority Will December 1, 2012 at 1:29 pm #

    Safari – so good.

  2. avatar
    Greenfinches December 1, 2012 at 1:48 pm #

    Firefox fine with me. I gave up with IE6 and have not gone back to Mr Gates since….

  3. avatar
    donna December 1, 2012 at 1:53 pm #

    Greenfinches:

    i agree

  4. avatar
    Dr. Conspiracy December 1, 2012 at 2:10 pm #

    Internet Explorer is just too darned easy to be exploited.

  5. avatar
    Orlyfan December 1, 2012 at 2:38 pm #

    People still use IE? How quaint.

  6. avatar
    Thrifty December 1, 2012 at 4:42 pm #

    Doc, are you sure you want to fix it? Why not just take a cue from Orly and blame it on your enemies? That seems a lot easier.

  7. avatar
    diskiss December 1, 2012 at 4:53 pm #

    Oh Doc, man, you just dont get it! This ain’t just some little browser issue, man, this is a metaphorical bullseye painted right on that purty little cowboy hat of yours. This is hacking tampering conspiring and treasoning in a way you aint never seen. This is birthers, truthers, secessionists, prohibitionists, foxbots, wndeists, and RICO plaintiffs AT THE GATES, man, and you gotta figure out how to fight or it’s over! Don’t you realize what’s happening? “Text obscured by huge quotation marks?” Doc, check out Taitz’s site, it’s a cyber-ops laboratory for these kind of design attacks. C’mon brother, wake up and smell the pancakes, this is serious, and you need to get with the program cuz they’re coming for you, just as soon as they track your IP address.

  8. avatar
    LW December 1, 2012 at 5:25 pm #

    Dennis Hopper is Randy Quaid, in Jon Stewart’s Judgment at Rancho Santa Margarita.

  9. avatar
    JPotter December 1, 2012 at 7:10 pm #

    At my office, we are forced, by lazy, itinerant IT who’s on a brother-in-law contract, to use IE8. This is, in my opinion, the worst version of the worst browser ever. I was the main client contact at an internet publisher when IE 8 was current.(Yes, I was the guy that took the specs from the customers to the engineers … “I have people skills dammit!”). 98% of all technical complaints went back to users selection of browser. Unless blessed with limitless resources, you code for the web, and then you make work-arounds for IE. The prevalent hubris, among coders who have yet to submit to the inevitable, is “F—— IE and anyone using it. Tell them to get a real browser.”

    IE simply does darn near everything differently and worse than all other major browsers. And, although, its market share has been declining for a decade, its still the default browser on the default platform. Users of any experience immediately disable it (I delete it on all my systems!), but casual users can’t be bothered and just use it.

    Doc, I’ve been seeing all sorts of weird things here when viewed from IE8 at work. It’s IE, so I don’t say anything. Remember the image I couldn’t see on the recent Corsi article, the Guy Fawkes masks? I went back and checked. In IE 8, the table wasn’t flowing properly, and the image was behind the skyscrapers WND runs on the right! At least I wasn’t crazy. Often when loading OCT, what appears to be a mobile version loads. Refreshing (usually) fixes that. And you should see the way the pages load. I can’t describe it.

    I hope you can always support all platforms and reach the widest audience, but, ultimately, what are ya gonna do, Doc? IE … it’s the web’s Chinatown.

  10. avatar
    JackOL December 1, 2012 at 9:20 pm #

    …or you turn on Compatibility View in IE for this site.

  11. avatar
    JPotter December 1, 2012 at 9:40 pm #

    JackOL:
    …or you turn on Compatibility View in IE for this site.

    Compatibility View is for backwards-compatibility. No help in areas in which IE has been left behind, or gone in an entirely different direction than the rest of the web. Telling IE8 or 9 to view a site as if it were compatible with 6 or 7 isn’t much help.

  12. avatar
    Northland10 December 2, 2012 at 2:16 am #

    One alternative for IE9 is to open “developer tools” (from the menu or F12) and change the browser mode and document mode to Internet Explorer 8. They are on the menu line of the developer console that appears at the bottom of the page. Unfortunately, it only works in the current session and the user has to select them again if they exit IE9.

    If you are on a work computer, you may find this feature missing or unavailable. IT folks are funny that way.

  13. avatar
    US Citizen December 2, 2012 at 2:29 am #

    JPotter: it’s the web’s Chinatown.

    Is this true Misha?

  14. avatar
    Andrew Vrba, PmG December 2, 2012 at 8:26 am #

    People still use IE?

  15. avatar
    JackOL December 2, 2012 at 1:17 pm #

    JPotter: Compatibility View is for backwards-compatibility. No help in areas in which IE has been left behind, or gone in an entirely different direction than the rest of the web. Telling IE8 or 9 to view a site as if it were compatible with 6 or 7 isn’t much help.

    Yes it is since it resolved the issue immediately.

  16. avatar
    misha marinsky December 2, 2012 at 2:18 pm #

    JPotter: IE … it’s the web’s Chinatown.

    I live in Chinatown – literally.

    US Citizen: Is this true Misha?

    No.

  17. avatar
    JPotter December 2, 2012 at 4:18 pm #

    US Citizen: Is this true Misha?

    It was a reference to the movie Chinatown. According to the movie, LA’s Chinatown was a hopeless place.

  18. avatar
    US Citizen December 2, 2012 at 6:27 pm #

    JPotter: It was a reference to the movie Chinatown. According to the movie, LA’s Chinatown was a hopeless place.

    As a theme, I agree.
    As a film, it won an Academy award so it wasn’t that bad. ;-)

    Anyway to stay on topic, I’m on a Mac running Firefox or Roccat.
    Neither had any problem with the quotes.
    In Firefox, the quotes were large and slightly overlapped text, but they were in a light grey and didn’t truly obscure anything.
    I have IE, but rarely use it.

  19. avatar
    Thrifty December 3, 2012 at 1:49 pm #

    There’s a web game I’ve been meaning to play again. It ONLY works in IE. It’s a remake of a classic game called Madmaze from the old Prodigy service from the early 90s. I suppose I should get around to installing some sort of IE emulator add-on for Firefox.

  20. avatar
    JPotter December 3, 2012 at 2:38 pm #

    So, here I am at work again, enjoying the IE8. Google constantly reminds me to “get a modern browser” and offers a redirect to whatbrowser.org. It’s a very cute page. I finally got irked enough to push the outdated software issue. We are running an old Server, this as new as it gets. Ouch! Life among the Luddites. Have I mentioned the insistence on printing PDF forms out and completing them by hand?

    Anyway, I must apologize to JackOL. Although the stated purpose of IE’s compatibility View is to make old pages work in new browsers, by disabling new technologies/standards, etc. Doing so can get ‘new’ pages to work better in old browsers … possibly losing functionality, but it’s a trade-off.

    For grins I fired up the ACID3 test here. scored a 22. For extra grins, I turned compatibility view on on the ACID3 page. The test failed completely. The browser had indeed gone back in time.

    For what it’s worth, OCT looks good from here today.

  21. avatar
    Keith December 3, 2012 at 4:03 pm #

    JPotter: We are running an old Server, this as new as it gets.

    I don’t think that should stop your IT Dept from certifying and using newer browsers. New browsers know how to talk to old servers just fine.

  22. avatar
    JPotter December 3, 2012 at 4:27 pm #

    Keith: IT Dept

    Thanks for the breathe of reason! IT dept., he says, that’s one guy on call. You are right, that isn’t what’s stopping them. You’d have to be here to believe it. I just put up with the place, and have my own tech heaven at home.

  23. avatar
    JPotter December 3, 2012 at 5:13 pm #

    Keith: New browsers know how to talk to old servers just fine.

    Ah, and I meant [Windows] Server 2003. He locks out any browser other than IE, and IE8 is the last to support WinServ2003. They did recently replace the server … and promptly installed old software on it.

  24. avatar
    Keith December 3, 2012 at 9:37 pm #

    JPotter: Ah, and I meant [Windows] Server 2003. He locks out any browser other than IE, and IE8 is the last to support WinServ2003. They did recently replace the server … and promptly installed old software on it.

    YGBKM! Is he secretly using your system for some kind of nefarious undertaking? Or getting kickbacks from M$oft? I can’t think of any possible reason to ‘lock out’ browsers that are demonstrably more secure and resource efficient.

    I can understand needing WS2003. The place where I volunteer (a state historical society) has a prehistoric library system that they can’t afford to upgrade and when it failed I built them a new box with SBS2011 on it. The library software wouldn’t run, or at least it was too hard to make it work. I just fired up VirtualBox under SBS2011 and installed WS2003 on a VM. It is actually much much easier to manage than standalone. Of course, much of the ease of management improvement is because backup is on USB disk drives instead of tapes, and the new server is quiet enough that it can be put where the staff can get to it instead of upstairs in a dusty, un-airconditioned store room.

    So yes, WS2003 still has useful life. That doesn’t mean you have to keep everything 10 years old and unsecure.

  25. avatar
    US Citizen December 4, 2012 at 8:20 am #

    Me loves VirtualBox. :)
    Runs on almost everything, is free and can support a huge number of OS’s.
    There’s nothing like running a wholly different OS in a separate window and being able to copy and paste between OS’s.

    Given the speed of the host CPU, sometimes you can even run (usually older) OS’s faster than they would run natively on past CPUs.
    DOS 3.1 was originally meant for CPUs at 2,4,6 and 8 mhz.
    Then, a “Turbo mode” might mean a 12 mhz processor.
    Running DOS 3.1 on a CPU running at over 3 ghz is quite nice.