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Vote!

VoteHereTomorrow is election day in the United States for federal offices and for many state and local ones. I’ll be working as a poll manger myself, and so I have already voted absentee. I encourage everyone eligible to vote. Turnout matters. I expect pretty much every candidate I voted for to lose. Still, voting is my right, and I will be counted.

While working tomorrow, I will take off my partisan hat and park the bumper-stickered Obotmobile more than 200 feet from the entrance to the precinct voting place. Voting is a right; voting is a civic duty; voting is a celebration of American freedom.

26 Responses to Vote!

  1. avatar
    CarlOrcas November 3, 2014 at 7:13 pm #

    We just deposited our ballots in our local ballot drop box.

    No friendly poll manager like you but it works real well.

  2. avatar
    Andrew Vrba, PmG November 3, 2014 at 7:36 pm #

    Our polling place is literally right across the street.
    The bad news, is that its at a senior activity center, so getting mauled to death by oldsters will be a very real possibility.

  3. avatar
    Andrew Vrba, PmG November 3, 2014 at 9:18 pm #

    Nancy, we don’t believe your insane ramblings. Never have. Never will. You cannot change that.

  4. avatar
    Dave November 3, 2014 at 9:32 pm #

    In contrast, I expect everyone I vote for tomorrow will win — but the GOP will gain seats anyway.

  5. avatar
    Bernard Sussman November 4, 2014 at 12:17 am #

    For godssake VOTE. People died to defend the right to vote. The evildoers are counting that good people won’t bother to vote, and next election cycle that good candidates will remember that fact and give up rather than run. So show up. Make the bad guys have to fight to win …. maybe they won’t – this election or maybe next – because you didn’t stay home on Election Day.

  6. avatar
    Andrew Vrba, PmG November 4, 2014 at 12:46 am #

    Dave:
    In contrast, I expect everyone I vote for tomorrow will win — but the GOP will gain seats anyway.

    I live in a Red State, so the chance that the people I vote for getting elected is always a crap shoot, but you gotta take that shot.

  7. avatar
    Kate1230 November 4, 2014 at 1:59 am #

    h
    Crustacean:
    No, Nancy, “we” do not know that.Please – and I can NOT emphasize this enough – speak for yourself.

    You are the joke, Nancy, along with your fairy tales that are so crazy that you can’t keep the details straight. When you’re telling the truth, there’s nothing to worry about remembering.

  8. avatar
    Punchmaster via mobile November 4, 2014 at 12:42 pm #

    Made it to the polls, thankfully the elderly hoards where distracted, and we were able to vote without being eaten! 😉

  9. avatar
    sfjeff November 4, 2014 at 1:42 pm #

    I will be voting- I shamefully admit that I am not as well prepared as I would have liked, but I did spend about 2 hours last night making my final decisions.

    I would like for people to want to vote- but for the sorry folks who can’t get off off their asses to vote- we are probably better off without their votes.

  10. avatar
    Janny November 4, 2014 at 2:57 pm #

    We voted last week — but we live in Texas so I don’t expect anyone we voted for to win. But, there’s always next time!

  11. avatar
    Rickey November 4, 2014 at 3:07 pm #

    I’m off to vote in a few minutes. Mid-afternoon is usually a good time to get in and out quickly.

    I will say that there have been a lot of get out the vote phone calls. We have a close race for Congressperson. I’m no fan of Andrew Cuomo, but he is likely to be re-elected with a 20-point margin of victory.

  12. avatar
    alg November 4, 2014 at 3:11 pm #

    I voted by mail-in ballot ten days ago. Am happy to do so. Am looking forward to watching the returns this evening

  13. avatar
    Paul November 4, 2014 at 5:40 pm #

    I think it’s past time we all stop engaging Nancy. She’s clearly mentally ill, and after a while it starts to feel like we’re picking on the incompetent. Let her rant.

  14. avatar
    Paul November 4, 2014 at 5:41 pm #

    Doc — Wait, what?! Why do you need to vote absentee when you;re right there at the polls? Is that some rule for poll managers?

  15. avatar
    jdkinpa November 4, 2014 at 6:29 pm #

    My wife and I voted about an hour ago. I’m a blue speck in a sea of red here in Central Pennsylvania. When voting you sign the voter registration (poll book). This is just anecdotal evidence, but looking down the page while I signed, I was the only D on the page. My wife registered as an independent so she was listed NOP and she was the only one on that page. I voted straight Democratic and I do expect Tom Wolf to beat Tom Corbett but that would be the only one. The challengers the Democrats put forth were pretty much place holders in the other contests. For those who voted. Good on You..

  16. avatar
    Dr. Conspiracy November 4, 2014 at 8:40 pm #

    A poll manager doesn’t necessarily vote where he works. I actually did work where I normally vote, and I could have voted today, but they recommend that the managers vote absentee because they may not have time if the lines are long. Today, there were times where there were no voters at all at the precinct, when I could have voted.

    Paul:
    Doc — Wait, what?!Why do you need to vote absentee when you;re right there at the polls?Is that some rule for poll managers?

  17. avatar
    Dr. Conspiracy November 4, 2014 at 8:44 pm #

    It’s done, and it was a very long day.

  18. avatar
    Paul November 4, 2014 at 10:24 pm #

    Bravo

  19. avatar
    ObiWanCannoli November 5, 2014 at 2:16 am #

    jdkinpa: I’m a blue speck in a sea of red here in Central Pennsylvania.

    As James Carville would say, you are in Alabama. LOL!

  20. avatar
    Steve November 11, 2014 at 2:54 am #

    Dr. Conspiracy,
    Tonight, on a local radio station they were talking about a poll worker in New Hampshire who was fired for saying “God bless you” to voters.
    Most people seem to be sympathetic toward her, saying it’s another sign of political correctness gone amuck.
    I tend to think that a poll worker is representing the local government and should not be bringing their religion or personal politics into that capacity.
    What’s your take?

    Here is the link.:
    http://www.wmur.com/politics/poll-worker-claims-she-was-fired-for-saying-god-bless-you/29646734

  21. avatar
    The Magic M November 11, 2014 at 5:26 am #

    Steve: I tend to think that a poll worker is representing the local government and should not be bringing their religion or personal politics into that capacity.

    I tend to think that you don’t need to take the “religious neutrality” to extremes. I don’t freak out when the woman handing me my new ID card wears a cross around her neck, although I consider religion stupid. And I wouldn’t freak out over a star of David or a Muslim symbol, either.
    I mean, it’s not like the voting booths had a big cross on them or the ballots were saying “I am making this choice in the name of our Lord Jesus Christ”.

  22. avatar
    Dr. Conspiracy November 11, 2014 at 9:19 am #

    Taking the easy part first, politics is definitely off limits for a poll worker. We’re trained not to discuss politics in the polling place, even among ourselves lest we be overheard.

    Religious symbols are a tougher question. In our culture a Christian cross can be a religious symbol or just a fashion statement. Around here it’s not unusual for a cashier at a Walmart store to say “have a blessed day.” To complicate matters, a fair number of polling places are in churches, where religious symbols are certainly going to be nearby. I seem to recall (a long time ago) that I attended a church were that was a polling place for a couple of years, and I think (not sure) that we were asked to cover any posters or symbols.

    In the case of Walmart, someone offended by the “blessed day” remark is free to shop elsewhere. They do not have that option at a polling place. I think that a polling place should be a place of extreme neutrality, where every possible action is taken to avoid any possible barrier or offense to an eligible voter, and even the appearance of favoritism towards any political faction is banished.

    Steve: I tend to think that a poll worker is representing the local government and should not be bringing their religion or personal politics into that capacity.
    What’s your take?

  23. avatar
    Dr. Conspiracy November 11, 2014 at 9:26 am #

    The supervisor said that the “God bless you” remark was not why the election worker was not invited to serve this year. In any case, she wasn’t fired.

    Steve: Tonight, on a local radio station they were talking about a poll worker in New Hampshire who was fired for saying “God bless you” to voters.

  24. avatar
    Steve November 11, 2014 at 10:43 am #

    Dr. Conspiracy:
    The supervisor said that the “God bless you” remark was not why the election worker was not invited to serve this year. In any case, she wasn’t fired.

    True. The radio guy still put the “She was fired for saying ‘God bless you'” spin on it because I guess that gets people outraged.

  25. avatar
    The Magic M (not logged in) November 11, 2014 at 3:28 pm #

    Dr. Conspiracy: I think that a polling place should be a place of extreme neutrality

    Up to the point where you can’t wear a blue shirt lest you are accused of trying to subconsciously influence people to vote Democrat? I mean, there’s gotta be a line drawn somewhere where “neutrality” becomes absurd.
    Reminds me of the RWNJ croaks about how an Obama mural at a school that was a polling place was not covered properly during the 2012 elections somehow caused Romney’s loss. As if that would actually influence people.

    Dr. Conspiracy: In our culture a Christian cross can be a religious symbol or just a fashion statement.

    I’m actually quite fond of wearing crosses despite being very critical of religion (as I went from Christian to Buddhist to agnostic). One of those inexplicable facts of life, I guess.

  26. avatar
    Dr. Conspiracy November 11, 2014 at 4:17 pm #

    If it were common for partisans of one party to wear distinctive shirt colors, then maybe one ought to wear a neutral shirt to the polls; however, that is not the case. Shirt colors aren’t regarded as significant. However, we don’t allow political signs within 200 ft. of a polling place and if someone shows up with a bumper sticker for a candidate or party, they have to move their car. I knew that, and parked the Obotmobile 300 ft away.

    When one runs an election they not only have to avoid bias, but the appearance of bias, and I do think they should have covered an Obama mural in 2012. When I said “extreme” I didn’t mean absurd.

    The Magic M (not logged in): Up to the point where you can’t wear a blue shirt lest you are accused of trying to subconsciously influence people to vote Democrat? I mean, there’s gotta be a line drawn somewhere where “neutrality” becomes absurd.