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How do you get your ex-boyfriend in trouble?

You mail an envelope containing cornstarch to the Maricopa County Sheriff’s Office and put his return address on the envelope.

Only it didn’t quite work out that way. It was previously reported that the MCSO went into lock down Friday when the white-powder-filled envelope was discovered (later reports said that only one floor of the building was evacuated), but it isn’t the ex-boyfriend who is under arrest, but the ex-girlfriend, who has confessed to the prank under threat of being forced to watch the Cold Case Posse’s second press conference repeatedly until she did. Read more at ABC News 15.

This incident reminds me of another where an inoperable black powder bomb was mailed to the sheriff in an attempt to cause trouble for a former business partner. Here’s that story.

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10 Responses to How do you get your ex-boyfriend in trouble?

  1. avatar
    Reality Check August 16, 2015 at 10:16 am #

    but the ex-girlfriend, who has confessed to the prank under threat of being forced to watch the Cold Case Posse’s second press conference repeatedly until she did.

    I have heard that is the MCSO’s most effective interrogation technique. 😆

  2. avatar
    Curious George August 16, 2015 at 11:11 am #

    “Deputies located 25-year-old Alma Pacheco at a Phoenix home early Saturday and she reportedly admitted sending the letter.”

    She doesn’t look a day older than 56. That Cold Case Posse press conference interrogation technique must be really draining.

  3. avatar
    Rickey August 16, 2015 at 2:34 pm #

    Curious George:

    She doesn’t look a day older than 56. That Cold Case Posse press conference interrogation technique must be really draining.

    I was thinking the same thing when I saw the photo.

  4. avatar
    Curious George August 16, 2015 at 3:02 pm #

    Rickey
    August 16, 2015
    Curious George:

    She doesn’t look a day older than 56. That Cold Case Posse press conference interrogation technique must be really draining.

    “I was thinking the same thing when I saw the photo.”

    It must be the reporter meant to write 52 not 25.

  5. avatar
    Rickey August 16, 2015 at 7:18 pm #

    Curious George:

    It must be the reporter meant to write 52 not 25.

    This story claims that she is 35.

    http://www.azcentral.com/story/news/local/phoenix/2015/08/15/woman-sent-letter-white-substance-boyfriend-joe-arpario-alma-pacheco-abrk/31786437/

  6. avatar
    Dr. Conspiracy August 16, 2015 at 7:59 pm #

    I see that they picked up on the former bomb scare that I mentioned in my article.

    Rickey: This story claims that she is 35.

  7. avatar
    Dave August 16, 2015 at 8:17 pm #

    My story is that I’m 39.

    Rickey: This story claims that she is 35.

  8. avatar
    Curious George August 16, 2015 at 8:38 pm #

    Rickey: This story claims that she is 35.

    http://www.azcentral.com/story/news/local/phoenix/2015/08/15/woman-sent-letter-white-substance-boyfriend-joe-arpario-alma-pacheco-abrk/31786437/

    Leave up to the press to present conflicting information.

    “Deputies located 25-year-old Alma Pacheco at a Phoenix home early Saturday and she reportedly admitted sending the letter. She was booked into jail on three felony counts, including causing an emergency response.” AP

  9. avatar
    The Magic M (not logged in) August 17, 2015 at 10:53 am #

    Curious George: It must be the reporter meant to write 52 not 25.

    Meth is one hell of a drug.

    Curious George: Leave up to the press to present conflicting information.

    For RWNJ’s, this one would have enough conflicting information to lead them to believe it’s a “false flag”. Because conflicting information means something nefarious is going on, and not conflicting information means the NWO is controlling everything. 😉

  10. avatar
    Georgetown JD August 19, 2015 at 11:13 pm #

    Reminds me of a similar hoax against Arpaio in 1999. Here is what The Arizona Republic reported:

    Spider sculpture threatens sheriff
    The Arizona Republic
    April 25, 1999

    It was a sculpture when it was outside the artist’s home. But when the metal spider was plopped outside Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio’s front door Saturday, it turned into a possible bomb and needed to be blown apart.

    The iron insect went out with a loud kaboom around 10:30 a.m. Saturday after being pummeled with water. The Sheriff’s Office bomb squad said the spider sculpture was hollow.

    Arpaio said he saw the spider, bomb or no bomb, as a direct threat on his life.

    “It’s not a bomb, but it’s still a threat, and I’m getting tired of these threats,” an angry Arpaio said outside his northeast Phoenix home, where the metal spider lay in pieces.

    Arpaio said he’d add to the team of investigators looking into death threats he’s received. The sheriff said the threat might be linked to a Web site whose operators claim to sympathize with the shooters in the Littleton, Colo., massacre. The Web site listed Arpaio as a hero – and Arpaio fired off a nasty e-mail ordering his name off the site.

    “Spiders live in webs, don’t they?” Arpaio said, linking the two events. “I knew when I sent that e-mail that I would get some sort of retaliation.”

    Detectives tracked down the man who made the spider, Thomas Hall, 37, who said the sculpture was stolen from his front lawn Saturday, probably by a man with whom he was feuding over a woman. Hall said he gave the man’s name to deputies, but the deputies hadn’t talked with him by Saturday night. Hall, who lives in the 3300 block of East Saint John Road, said his friend probably wasn’t trying to make any kind of statement against Arpaio.

    “Someone was just trying to create a hassle for me,” Hall said.

    The Sheriff’s Office said it couldn’t take any chances and needed to make sure the insect artwork wasn’t set to explode.

    The ordeal began around 7 a.m. when Arpaio’s wife, Ava, peeked out the window before getting The Republic and saw the 2-foot-long insect on the sidewalk, the sheriff said. “She came in and told me, “There’s a bomb outside,’ ” Arpaio said. “I looked out . . . and that looked very menacing.”

    The troublesome spider was made by Thomas Hall, who said the sculpture was stolen from his front lawn Saturday.

    The Sheriff’s Office SWAT team hustled the Arpaios out the back door and Phoenix police started evacuating neighbors. Meanwhile, the spider, with a black metal body, brown metal legs and grilles for eyes, sat staring into the Arpaio home. A bomb robot, sent over by the Department of Public Safety, scooted up to the sculpture and shot a projectile into it, causing a loud bang.

    A few minutes later, in a scene out of a science-fiction movie, a bomb squad officer dressed head-to-toe in a protective suit knelt down and peered into the spider’s innards with a flashlight.

    “We treat it like it’s going to get us,” said Deputy Phil Harris, who went nose-to-nose with the metal spider.

    The remote-controlled robot tipped the spider over on its back, setting it rocking on the asphalt. It then used a water cannon to shoot off its hind end. Other bomb squad officers poked around the remains and found nothing dangerous. “If it was a prank,” Chief Deputy Sheriff Dave Hendershott said, “it was a damn expensive one.”

    Meanwhile, deputies about five miles away combed around the spot where the spider was lifted.

    Hall, a machinist whose yard is decorated with the iron artwork he started making five years ago, said the spider theft comes in the middle of an ugly domestic dispute. He said this as he loaded his possessions into a pickup truck, leaving behind his “soon-to-be-ex old lady.” Hall described the man he thinks placed the spider in front of Arpaio’s house as a “drinking buddy I’m not seeing eye-to-eye with right now.” Hall said the man didn’t have any particular beef with Arpaio. But he didn’t like the spider too much.

    Deputies took Hall to the scene where he could see his destroyed creation. “I thought it was cool, because the legs were all up in the air,” he said. Hall said he told the Sheriff’s Office he wants the remains of his spider back. He said he hopes the water cannon made a good-size artistic hole in the side.

    “I knew my art would get me in the paper someday,” he said.