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Anti-birther attorney represents birther?

Yes!

imageIt appeared in a comment on this blog: Lucas Daniel Smith says that Loren Collins has offered to represent him pro bono in Smith’s defense against extradition from the Dominican Republic to Kenya. I find this a delicious story, full of twists and irony; however, I didn’t want to write an article about it until I had confirmation, and now I have. Collins confirmed to me in an email today that he made the offer of representing Smith, and further that his offer is sincere. (Loren is a straight-up guy as I have known him, and I wouldn’t have expected anything but sincerity from him.)

At this point Smith hasn’t accepted the offer, but said that he would decide by Monday. Since Collins isn’t yet representing Smith, he has no special access to documentation and records; we’re all in the same boat as to our capability of judging whether there is any real Kenyan extradition proceeding in the first place. I wrote about that question in my article: “Why did Bruce Steadman give Lucas Daniel Smith $5,800?

The initial irony would be Smith saying that he rejected representation because he couldn’t trust Collins, and that’s likely as far as it will go.

Update:

Lucas Smith, among his plethora of new articles, says he accepts Collin’s offer. I didn’t see that coming (I hasten to add that there’s no written agreement between Collins and Smith yet). It raises new interesting questions like how attorney-client privilege works in a case like this, and would Collins would be muzzled even if he found out that the extradition was a hoax, which I still believe it is? On the positive side, Smith is saying that Bruce Steadman will receive copies of all their correspondence which is important because if there is any victim here, it’s Steadman.

I have to give credit where credit is due. Just when you think there’s nothing new under the birther sun, they come up with something.

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Wikipedia was in the forefront of the battle over the Smith birth certificate

I was over at Birther Report last night to see if anyone had picked up on my April Fool’s Takedown, and I came across a comment by RS1 under an article about the new Lucas Smith Oppenheim birth certificate:

Roadburner101 – please note also the british DD/MM/YYYY date format used this time as opposed to the american MM/DD/YYYY date format he used last time – this also means one or the other is fake, so which is it lucas?

Wrong dingbat, OBot Road Rash. We were onto your change “the Kenyan date format” operations way back when. A Dr. CONspiracy BS Ops.

I, and a few others caught OBots in the BS act back in the day. Post from FR. Like this one:
- – - – - – - – -

” “That document is a fraud. The dates on it are American style month/day/year, most other countries including the UK format dates day/month/year.” [ <-- OBot propaganda BS]

[The truth -->] “Without commenting on authenticity of the CPGH BC, I personally researched the Wiki date format by country page in Sept of 2009 and found that Kenya was one of only three countries, IIRC, employing both the European and US style date formats. When I put this information up on the web, the Wiki page was immediately hacked by an Obot named Mystylplx who flagrantly tried to expunge Kenya as showing dual use. A war ensued for months with folks trying to restore the original data and Obots hacking it to cover for Barry without regard to the truth of the original page.

I just checked the page and the dual date format for Kenya has been restored for the moment. Obots never succeeded in removing the color on the global map showing Kenya as a dual format country, which it still show.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Date_format_by_count…
93 posted on Thursday, July 19, 2012 9:37:04 PM by Seizethecarp”

- – - – - – - – - – -
This CON-job - “Mystylpxl” – - remember this poster OBot bonehead? You DUmbass OBots trying to pull a lying fast one on everyone again.

The essential claim in all of that is that anti-birthers altered the Wikipedia to hide the fact that Kenya uses both the US and British date formatting systems. Did they?

In January of 2011 the Date Formats by Country article was split off from the main Date Formats article. And indeed, when one looks at the Wikipedia history for that main article, as it appeared on February 15, 2009, one finds:

imageThe reference link [74] goes to http://www.communication.go.ke/, a link no longer valid, but that may be familiar to long-time readers here, since that web site is one promoted by Lucas Smith himself as an example of official use of the US date format in Kenya. You can see what it once looked like in my 2011 article, “Date formats in Kenya.” That reference is not a source by Wikipedia standards, because it doesn’t actually say what Kenyan date formats are, only uses them (and apparently in a broken manner). To say that Kenya officially uses US date formatting from this source would be a conclusion of “original research” not allowed on the Wikipedia. I say all of that to conclude that the US date format item in the Wikipedia article was faulty since February of 2009, being unsourced, and as such any Wikipedia editor could have legitimately removed it.

That said, can we blame the original Wikipedia MDY format entry for Kenya on Smith or one of his supporters?

No. Here’s the Wikipedia page from October 28, 2008, where the US date format entry originated. The entry is sourced from a Microsoft page that has since been moved; however, I found the current version, and indeed, it has m/d/yyyy formatting for “Kiswahili (Kenya).” Kiswahili became an official national language in Kenya in 2010. (Of course the Smith Obama certificate is not written in Kiswahili.)

image

At the time the editing wars occurred, the Microsoft link had gone bad, along with any hint that the MDY format related to Kiswahili. This whole controversy appears to be just a mistake, exacerbated by web reference pages whose links went bad, and politicized by the birther/anti-birther conflict.

I’ve fixed the Wikipedia.

This is the way March ends

not with a bang but a whimper

Weather lore says that March comes in like a like a lion and goes out like a lamb. Applied to birtherism, March came in with bluster and high expectations of the great denouement of the “O-bots,” the shattering of their universe. Here on the last day of March, let’s take stock of the month:

  • Orly Taitz endorsed by Pastor Manning, only to find herself joined at the hip with his homophobic street sign
  • Tea Party Nation repudiates Taitz claim of endorsement
  • CalGuns repudiates Taitz claim of endorsement
  • Michael Shrimpton video gets no traction
  • FBI evidence of theft by threat, witness tampering and felony obstruction of justice by Maricopa County Sheriff’s Office reported
  • Former Cold Case Posse member Brian Reilly describes unprofessionalism within the Cold Case Posse
  • Congressmen Labrador and Huelskamp express disinterest in Sheriff Joe investigation
  • Doug Vogt’s mysterious “friendly judge” does not come through
  • McInnish appeal denied by Alabama Supreme Court (7 – 2)
  • Larry Klayman faces Bar disciplinary action in DC
  • Birther Walter Fitzpatrick III jailed
  • Birther Lucas Daniel Smith reportedly jailed in the Dominican Republic
  • More delays in Taitz’ Mississippi lawsuit, strengthening Defense case for sanctions
  • Supreme Court declines to hear Robert Laity appeal.
  • Birther Report doesn’t go live with its new super secure server
  • No announcement from the Maricopa County Sheriff’s office about an Obama investigation
  • No press conference, charges, investigative reports, or anything else of substance from Mike Zullo and the Cold Case Posse
  • Dow Jones Industrial Average up 136 points for the month of March
  • Universe pretty much the same

Check out my 2009 poem, “We are the Birthers.”

Now, let’s play the birther theme song!

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Why did Bruce Steadman give Lucas Daniel Smith $5,800?

and was it a good investment?

In an timing error almost as monumental as that of the release of Jerome Corsi’s Where’s the Birth Certificate?, Lucas Daniel Smith misses April Fools by a scant 3 days with his latest article: “Lucas Daniel Smith arrested (2014) for extradition to Kenya.”

Smith wrote:

On or about the 4th day of February 2014 while I was physically present in the Dominican Republic, the National Police (Policia Nacional) raided my home in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic with an arrest warrant for extradition to Kenya on criminal charges of allegedly bribing government officials in Kenya.

Smith claims to be in the Dominican Republic, free on 250,000 Dominican Pesos (about $5,800) bond, the money provided by birther Bruce Steadman. Smith, known for his documents, provides an image of a complaint (“acta de denuncia”) in Spanish.

Research questions:

  1. Does the Dominican Republic have an extradition treaty with Kenya?
  2. Is the “acta de denuncia” authentic?
  3. Has Bruce Stedman been conned out of $5,800?

I’m still checking on the matter of the extradition treaty. So far I have not found any bilateral treaty between the Dominican Republic and Kenya. The Dominican Republic has an extradition treaty with the contiguous with Kenya, Commonwealth countries, the United States, Italy, Finland, Greece, Poland, Spain, Peru, Germany and perhaps some others, but if Smith had been sought by Kenya, one would have though that they would be looking in the US, and one wonders how they would have found him in the Dominican Republic. See also, “Foreigners under Dominican Criminal Law.”

Persons familiar with the Spanish language, commenting on the Internet and on this blog say, that the document is riddled with errors, and not written by a native speaker of Spanish.

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One more observation on the POSFKBC

I mentioned in my previous article, “Smith posts another version of his POSFKBC" that I had been trying to figure out precisely what font was used to make his image. I did an experiment towards making that identification, putting text in a trial font next to his text on his own image and looking for differences in the character shapes. I thought that what I found was interesting enough to publish.

Presuming that the Smith document was at some point scanned, and given that scanners generally reduce the size of documents they scan just a bit to make counterfeiting more difficult, the font size of the Smith image is probably not a standard size. The program I used does not allow fractional point sizes, so my text is not precisely the same size. Also my text is a computer-generated original not printed and scanned, and Smith’s original document was saved as a JPG file at 44% quality, both reducing the crispness of the text appearance.

The font I used is True Type Garamond version 2.40, a font that was already on my computer and something that either comes with Windows or Microsoft Office. I do not claim any expertise on typography, but I think the similarity of my results to the Smith text is remarkable. What do you think1? Here’s the document (click to enlarge):


1I would not equate what I did here with the Dan Rather moment when the Bush National Guard letter was exposed as a likely-computer generated phony. The technique is similar, but the results not quite so compelling.

Smith posts another version of his POSFKBC

We’ve seen an evolutionary process in the document from Lucas Smith that purports to be a certified copy of a birth certificate (affectionately known by anti-birthers as the POSFKBC), that he says he obtained in Kenya, showing Barack Obama born at the Coast Province General Hospital in Mombasa. First, all we had was a shaky image in a video, purportedly made in Kenya. Then we got a wrinkled still version submitted in the Keyes v. Obama lawsuit by Orly Taitz. In 2012 we were treated to a photograph showing the raised seal more clearly. More recently, Smith claims to have obtained scans of details from the original from which the certified copy was made, and finally he has released the entire document that follows (click to enlarge):

Since this purports to be a copy of the original (not of the certified copy), it would lack the certifying elements of the earlier copy, elements that were troublesome due to internal contradictions. Some internal faults remain, such as the reversed date order (American style mm/dd/yyyy instead of Kenyan style dd/mm/yyyy), and the missing full date of birth of Obama’s father (which was not known at the time the certificate was published). And of course, no other birth certificate of this form has ever been put forward.

I did a cursory forensic analysis of the new document and about the only thing that stood out was the remarkably low quality of the JPG file (44%). In the earlier version of the certificate, it appeared that there is kerning in the word “Kenya” that one would not expect from 1961 typesetting equipment. The kerning is not evident in this document and this one is consistent with blotchy copying on the former. In that one instance, the new document helps the old.

Just for fun, I tried to identify the font used in the preprinted sections of the form (excluding the title) and the top result was Simoncini Garamond, a font designed in 1961. :shock: That’s not the right font because of a difference in the uppercase “B”. [When the quoted material consists of a single character, the period appears outside the quotation marks.] (Some anonymous person calling himself “the pressman” said that the font was Adobe Caslon, but it obviously isn’t.]

Anyway, I get to open the year with a shiny birther object to object to.