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Orly files fantasy fraud form

Not pausing long enough to read what it’s for, Orly Taitz DDS, Esq., the Energizer Bunny of fantasy fraud filers,  has fronted yet another frivolous complaint, this time on a form reserved for election process grievances under the Help America Vote Act (HAVA). HAVA deals with election facilities and voting formalities, not candidates for office. Orly, however, filled out a HAVA complaint against Barack Obama, claiming that he is not eligible because he has a fraudulent Connecticut social-security number. Oh, and in addition to the form she forwarded 208 pages of exhibits. (Poor trees.)

Official-complaint-Indiana-elections-board

I have a fondness for Indiana, and not just because their appeals court rebuffed the Birthers in the Ankeny v. Governor case. I’ve spent some time in Marion County, did some professional work there, enjoyed some good meals and enjoyed a little recreation. So here’s a shout out to the Hoosier State and my offer of sympathy that Orly is bugging you. I offer some advice:

The circular file is on the left.

UPDATE:

Orly Taitz reports that the State of Indiana has told her that she used the wrong form and sent it the wrong place. [Link to Taitz web site]

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21 Responses to Orly files fantasy fraud form

  1. avatar
    richCares February 10, 2012 at 4:26 pm #

    Orly got the following response from HAVA,
    Dear Mz Taitz
    Our trash bins were all filled so we had to flush your request in our toilet, thank you for your interest and please don’t come back.

  2. avatar
    RuhRoh February 10, 2012 at 4:29 pm #

    You have to wonder why the Notary went along with this stunt.

  3. avatar
    Dr. Conspiracy February 10, 2012 at 4:35 pm #

    He was paid to do it.

    RuhRoh: You have to wonder why the Notary went along with this stunt.

  4. avatar
    JPotter February 10, 2012 at 4:36 pm #

    RuhRoh: You have to wonder why the Notary went along with this stunt.

    Because she paid the $5. Heh. Nah, she probably knows a notary. She is a lawyer …. well, maybe not.

    Doc, my circular file is on the right. 😉

  5. avatar
    Keith February 10, 2012 at 5:37 pm #

    JPotter: Doc, my circular file is on the right.

    Heh. Mine is behind me. On the left.

    But when I turn around to use it, its on the right.

    What to do? What to do?

  6. avatar
    y_p_w February 10, 2012 at 5:39 pm #

    JPotter: Because she paid the $5. Heh. Nah, she probably knows a notary. She is a lawyer …. well, maybe not. Doc, my circular file is on the right.

    It’s $10 in California. That’s the maximum statutory amount that a notary can charge in California for a single signture. And that’s pretty much what they all charge. I tried comparison shopping, and couldn’t find a single notary service that didn’t charge the maximum allowed fee.

    I did manage to get something notarized without paying the fee once. A loan officer was also a notary.

  7. avatar
    JPotter February 10, 2012 at 5:40 pm #

    Keith: Heh. Mine is behind me. On the left. But when I turn around to use it, its on the right.What to do? What to do?

    Hit the one in the middle 😉

  8. avatar
    JPotter February 10, 2012 at 5:42 pm #

    y_p_w: I tried comparison shopping, and couldn’t find a single notary service that didn’t charge the maximum allowed fee.

    From their perspective, it’s like a maximum wage. Ouch!

    What if your notarizations are prettier than everyone else? What’s the incentive?

    Socialism! Obama strikes again!

  9. avatar
    ASK Esq February 10, 2012 at 5:44 pm #

    And, after it gets denied, she can ask for reconsideration based on this new evidence:

    http://www.snopes.com/politics/obama/birthers/studentid.asp

  10. avatar
    donna February 10, 2012 at 6:02 pm #

    i’m a notary public in ny where the fee is $2 – i have never taken a dime

  11. avatar
    Bill DuBerger February 10, 2012 at 6:21 pm #

    Maybe Fluffy became a notary.

  12. avatar
    G February 10, 2012 at 7:01 pm #

    *sigh* So sad to see such blatent frauds continuing to be perpetrated out there. But then again, Birtherism was always a fraud myth to begin with…

    ASK Esq: And, after it gets denied, she can ask for reconsideration based on this new evidence:http://www.snopes.com/politics/obama/birthers/studentid.asp

  13. avatar
    y_p_w February 10, 2012 at 8:02 pm #

    donna: i’m a notary public in ny where the fee is $2 – i have never taken a dime

    I found this list:

    http://www.punny.org/money/maximum-notary-fees-by-state-dont-get-ripped-off-by-big-fat-notary-guys/

    Some states don’t have a max fee, but say it should be “reasonable”. In Wisconsin and South Carolina, the max fee is 50 cents. I don’t think many people get into this for the money if the fee is puny. At least in states where it’s $5-10, I can imagine a business actually making some money doing this.

    In California the fee is in the California Government Code, and only legislation (or maybe a voter initiative if someone really wanted to put it on the ballot) can change the amount.

    http://www.leginfo.ca.gov/cgi-bin/displaycode?section=gov&group=08001-09000&file=8200-8230

    8211. Fees charged by a notary public for the following services
    shall not exceed the fees prescribed by this section.
    (a) For taking an acknowledgment or proof of a deed, or other
    instrument, to include the seal and the writing of the certificate,
    the sum of ten dollars ($10) for each signature taken.
    (b) For administering an oath or affirmation to one person and
    executing the jurat, including the seal, the sum of ten dollars
    ($10).
    (c ) For all services rendered in connection with the taking of any
    deposition, the sum of twenty dollars ($20), and in addition
    thereto, the sum of five dollars ($5) for administering the oath to
    the witness and the sum of five dollars ($5) for the certificate to
    the deposition.
    (d) No fee may be charged to notarize signatures on vote by mail
    ballot identification envelopes or other voting materials.
    (e) For certifying a copy of a power of attorney under Section
    4307 of the Probate Code the sum of ten dollars ($10).
    (f) In accordance with Section 6107, no fee may be charged to a
    United States military veteran for notarization of an application or
    a claim for a pension, allotment, allowance, compensation, insurance,
    or any other veteran’s benefit.

  14. avatar
    Keith February 11, 2012 at 12:56 am #

    y_p_w: I found this list:

    I looked up notaries in Victoria Australia: Solicitors have the monopoly on Notary Services.

    The (recommended) fees list:

    1.1 The Notary may charge a fee to undertake matters such as any of the following:

    Perusal of documents and searches
    Drawing additional documents such as special declarations or affidavits
    Obtaining information from third parties
    Interviewing persons other than the appearer(s)

    For each six minutes engaged $45

    Attestations, declarations and oaths

    2.1 Short attestation without a certificate prepared by the Notary $60

    2.2 Attestation, declaration or oath and providing a Notarial Certificate $110

    2.3 For each additional deponent, declarant or signatory at the same time $40

    2.4 Preparing and completing an exhibit note $50

    2.5 Completing and sealing an exhibit note provided by others $40

    Certification of Copy Documents

    3.1 Certification of copy documents up to ten pages $110

    3.2 For each further page after ten certified $10

    Certificates

    4.1 As to any matter not included in any other item of the scale, in addition to
    necessary searches, enquiries, inspections and discussions, which may be
    charged for under item 1.1 above and 8.1 below, according to
    length, but including completion and sealing:

    Up to three folios $150
    Four to six folios $180
    For each folio after six $50

    4.2 Certificate of good standing of a corporation $250
    plus notarial time charges for ancillary work to enable preparation
    of the certificate in accordance with item 1.1 above and 8.1 below

    4.3 Certificate as to Australian or foreign law up to three folios $250
    Charge for each additional folio after three $80

    Duplicates of any notarial act

    5.1 For each of the first ten copies after the first:
    Half the total fees for the original

    5.2 For each copy after the tenth: One quarter of the total fees for the original

    Ships’ Protests

    6.1 Completing and certifying copies of a protest prepared by a ship’s Master $200

    6.2 Preparing and completing a protest including annexures, copies and
    any work in relation to additional work and parties – to be charged in
    accordance with item 1.1 above and 8.1 below
    If there are additional witnesses or parties, additional charges
    are to be made under item 1.1 above and 8.1 below.

    Bills of Exchange

    7.1 Noting a bill of exchange $150

    7.2 Presenting a bill of exchange including travelling time –
    to be charged in accordance with item 1.1 above and 8.1 below

    7.3 Protesting a bill of exchange $200

    Miscellaneous services

    8.1 Clerical work not undertaken by the Notary personally
    For each six minutes $10

    8.2 Providing photocopies of documents, per page $2

    8.3 Attending to present and uplift a notarial act for authentication or to have an apostille affixed by the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade $100

    8.4 For attendances and correspondence, photocopying and the like to obtain an apostille – charges to be in accordance with item 1.1 and 8.1 above

    Out of Pocket Expenses

    All out of pocket expenses incurred by the notary, including company and land title search fees, access fees charged by Internet Service Providers, Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade apostille fees etc are additional.

    Many trivial things that you might get notarized in the US, don’t need to be notarized in Oz.

    A ‘Statutory Declaration’ is something you might prepare to provide testimony about the history of your fence line in a boundary dispute with your neighbor, or other ‘innocuous’ disputes like that. Other things like an application for a ‘Seniors Discount Card’ essentially need a stat dec to ‘swear’ that you are over 60 and not full time employed.

    Such Statutory Declarations can be ‘witnessed’ by any of several classes of professionals assumed to be of upright character and good standing in the community. These professionals include Pharmacists, Bank Managers, Police Officers, Veterinarians, Solicitors, and possibly a few others. They can I believe charge just about anything they want for the service, but most charge less than $5.

    The pharmacist that I go to for this service, charges ‘a gold coin’ ($1 or $2 coin) donation to the Guide Dogs. Bank Managers just about universally refuse to perform the service, except when preparing loan paperwork through their branch. I expect that Solicitors would charge like a wounded bull for the service.

  15. avatar
    roadburner February 11, 2012 at 6:59 am #

    just had a look at oily’s site (got a good antivirus), and she appears to be in full-blown meltdown.

    from some of the comments it would seem her sycophants are going the same way.

    `crazy train, now leaving from platform 1 destination birtherstan.’,

  16. avatar
    Jules February 11, 2012 at 8:04 am #

    RuhRoh: You have to wonder why the Notary went along with this stunt.

    In the US, it is not the job of a notary public to check the accuracy or appropriateness of documents. Their job is to make sure that the person executing the document is who they say they are and that any oaths are duly sworn. Notaries in the US are generally not allowed to give legal advice unless they are also qualified lawyers (which most aren’t).

    The situation is very different in other countries. In England and Wales, solicitors (ordinary lawyers) are also commissioners for oaths and they handle most affidavits and statutory declarations. The fees charges by notaries for any oaths, attestations, and authentications are much higher than those charged by solicitors. Generally speaking, a notary is used where there is an international dimesnion to the process and specialised advice is needed on the documentation.

  17. avatar
    Stephen February 11, 2012 at 1:56 pm #

    Was trying to read her “Nature of Grievance” from the viewpoint of the person at the Indiana Secretary of State’s office who gets to review these. I can’t clearly discern what her grievance is. So I see an automatic REJECT on the complaint. Reading between the lines I can guess, but the complaint is supposed to be clear, not a long-winded rant. Oh, and the 208 pages of attachments are supposed to support your allegation not be needed to establish what your complaint is.

    It would be so simple to write: “Barack Obama should not be on the ballot because he doesn’t meet the requirements in the Constitution for the position. Specifically, he is not a Natural Born Citizen.” Then lay out the evidence. BTW, there is no Constitutional requirement for a Social Security number so that argument just muddies the waters.

  18. avatar
    Rickey February 11, 2012 at 10:04 pm #

    RuhRoh:
    You have to wonder why the Notary went along with this stunt.

    The notary is only verifying the identity of the person who signed the document. A notary doesn’t care what the document says or what its purpose is.

  19. avatar
    Dr. Conspiracy February 15, 2012 at 2:22 pm #

    Taitz reports on her blog today that the Indiana Elections board has informed her that she filed the wrong form.

    http://www.orlytaitzesq.com/?p=31728

  20. avatar
    JPotter February 15, 2012 at 2:28 pm #

    Dr. Conspiracy: Taitz reports on her blog today that the Indiana Elections board has informed her that she filed the wrong form.http://www.orlytaitzesq.com/?p=31728

    Called it. As did everyone else. And this means some other unfortunate piece of paper will be defaced by her scribbles! I still have the typewriter that was anonymously donated, and am willing to make her a deal.

  21. avatar
    Majority Will February 15, 2012 at 2:59 pm #

    JPotter: Called it. As did everyone else. And this means some other unfortunate piece of paper will be defaced by her scribbles! I still have the typewriter that was anonymously donated, and am willing to make her a deal.

    Speaking of screwing up forms, I wonder if her dental goodies bag has tampons and hemorrhoid cream instead of floss and toothpaste samples.