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Thank God for Mississippi

For those of you not raised in the southern United States, the phrase “thank God for Mississippi” may not be familiar; it is familiar to me, born and raised in Alabama and transplanted to South Carolina. You see, the places where I lived often appeared near the bottom of states listed by income, education, and other social measures. But we came out near the bottom, not at the bottom. The nadir usually belonged to Mississippi, and hence the saying, “thank God for Mississippi,” that we’re not on the bottom.

Today the Republican Presidential Primaries were held in Mississippi and Alabama with a pretty even split between Romney, Santorum (small lead) and Gingrich. According to Public Policy Polling 45% of Alabama Republican voters think Barack Obama is a Muslim, but in Mississippi it’s 52%. Also Mississippi voters are a little less likely to believe in evolution than those from Alabama.

So with the rest of the normal people in my home state, I say, “thank God for Mississippi.”

11 Responses to Thank God for Mississippi

  1. avatar
    Thrifty March 13, 2012 at 10:21 pm #

    You never do anything on the Obama Muslim myths around here. It’s all about the natural born citizen thing.

  2. avatar
    Dr. Conspiracy March 13, 2012 at 10:30 pm #

    That’s about right. I never found much to the story. 54 articles mention the word “Muslim” but a scant few could be described as on that topic.

    What there is :

    http://www.obamaconspiracy.org/category/muslim-myths/

    Thrifty: You never do anything on the Obama Muslim myths around here. It’s all about the natural born citizen thing.

  3. avatar
    keith March 13, 2012 at 10:51 pm #

    How could they hold a primary in Mississississississippi today (sorry, I got stuck in a loop)?

    Doesn’t Orly have an outstanding restraining order against it or something?

  4. avatar
    Dr. Conspiracy March 13, 2012 at 11:37 pm #

    I heard that Taitz’s motion in opposition to the Defendants’ motions to dismiss was not received by the court before the primary.

    Here’s her motion in opposition to the Democratic Party (spelled it right, by the way, unlike the original complaint) (30 pages):

    http://www.orlytaitzesq.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/03/MS-final-opposition-motion-Dem-party.pdf

    A commenter on Taitz’s blog said:

    Orly did someone at the Post Office commit a crime by purposefully delaying the delivery of your time sensitive Priority Certified mail package?

    and Taitz replied:

    I can’t say for sure, however it is really suspicious. I sent the pleadings and checks by priority certified mail last Monday. Regular mail within the US should take about 3 days. Priority certified mail should go only one or two days. There should have been notations of it going through the sorting facility in CA and along the route. It took 8 days to get to the sorting facility at Jackson MS, it will be in court tomorrow. There were no notations of it going through any facilities. It just suddenly appeared in Jackson MS 8 days later out of nowhere. My guess, someone kept it somewhere. Question: who and where?

    She should have sent it Express Mail. Cheapskate.

    keith: Doesn’t Orly have an outstanding restraining order against it or something?

  5. avatar
    J. Potter March 13, 2012 at 11:42 pm #

    Hmmm … cutbacks at the PO affect transit times?

    Keep voting Republican, Orly.

    Let’s see some of that rugged individualism in action! Why rely on the socialist organs of the welfare state! If it’s so important, deliver it in person! You’ve flown to Hawaii for less cause! 😉

  6. avatar
    Dr. Conspiracy March 14, 2012 at 2:45 am #

    I do a lot of priority mail shipping. Three days is usually plenty to get it coast to coast. I got one from Washington State to SC in 2 days. However, the tracking info doesn’t show anything between WA and SC. Jackson, MS, where the court is, is the state capitol, so I would expect it is a USPS sorting facility. I don’t have experience shipping certified mail.

    I can’t explain why it would take 8 days, but then I can’t explain why I didn’t get the jury summons for next week either. The court house is just 2 miles from here.

    J. Potter: Hmmm … cutbacks at the PO affect transit times?

  7. avatar
    Lupin March 14, 2012 at 3:03 am #

    Isn’t that the poll I quoted here a couple of days ago?

  8. avatar
    G March 14, 2012 at 3:19 am #

    The results were nearly the same in both AL & MS:

    1st – Santorum
    2nd – Gingrich
    3rd – Romney
    4th – Paul

    Summary Analysis:

    It was a great night for Santorum and gives quite a boost of momentum for him.

    Newt somehow manages to cling to just enough of a thread of legitimate argument to continue on from here. Losing both of these southern states should have rendered him DOA. However, his 2nd place performances in both states provided two small grains of comfort to his candidacy & his argument to continue forward:

    First of all, he beat the front runner, Romney in both situations. For Newt’s motivation, this is enough solace to cling to, on its own. Second, he was only beat by Santorum by a few percentage points in both of these contests. Therefore, he also can cling to claiming a close race. In order for Newt to move beyond just “life support”, he desperately needs either Rick or Mitt to stumble badly enough to create yet another “opening” for him…. While not impossible, such a scenario is quite a stretch. He’s got a few opportunities in the upcoming contests between now & April 3rd to turn it around. (MO, IL, LA, DC, MD, WI). If he can’t supplant Santorum in any of those, most of his remaining base of support will likely dry up in that long interim stretch before the April 24th contests.

    For Romney, it was a fairly devastating night. Again, I blame his campaign for their continuing ability to provide astoundingly bad optics and setting of the stage before difficult state contests for him as a candidate. At this stage of the campaign, he *does* need to prove that he can actually win hard core GOP states and win in the South in order to be viewed as credible and legitimate to the party as a whole. He has still failed miserably to seal that deal…which is why this year’s contest continues to be unstable and full of uncertainty.

    However, his campaign made a big public push over the past week to lock down various “party machine” endorsements and even attention grabbing entertainment endorsements (Jeff Foxworthy) and spent a lot of time earlier in the week touting polls that pushed a meme that he had moved into “frontrunner” status in those states and was going to lock the race down. As this same thing has played out time and time again, his campaign only served to set a higher bar of perceived expectations than they could deliver…and that only served to make their 3rd place finish look even worse and leave them with nothing but egg on their faces.

    Ron Paul came in a distant fourth and received some of his worst result totals to date. After failing to claim any wins through Super Tuesday, Paul’s campaign has ceased to be an actual contender, even though he will likely remain in the race until the bitter end.

    The big question for Paul is what his “bargaining” strategy plans are with the delegates he’s accumulated…and will end up stealing away from others in final caucus allocations. Thanks to all those bizarre “non binding” caucus formulas that don’t actually affix a delegate’s vote until later on (often at the GOP convention itself), the entire delegate calculus is an awful mess of nothing but sheer guesswork at this point. From the beginning, Paul seems to be the only campaign fixated on taking advantage of these bizarre rules and stealthily placing his people in position to end up with the power over these types of delegates at the final stage. But to what end? He could potentially end up with several hundred more delegates than expected at the convention….but what can he realistically achieve with that substantial, yet still small bargaining chip?

    But in terms of campaign momentum & coverage… Paul is pretty much reduced to just a footnote between now and the convention.

    Today the Republican Presidential Primaries were held in Mississippi and Alabama with a pretty even split between Romney, Santorum (small lead) and Gingrich. According to Public Policy Polling 45% of Alabama Republican voters think Barack Obama is a Muslim, but in Mississippi it’s 52%. Also Mississippi voters are a little less likely to believe in evolution than those from Alabama.

  9. avatar
    Dr. Conspiracy March 14, 2012 at 3:28 am #

    It sounds familiar.

    Lupin: Isn’t that the poll I quoted here a couple of days ago?

  10. avatar
    JPotter March 14, 2012 at 9:26 am #

    Dr. Conspiracy: I can’t explain why it would take 8 days, but then I can’t explain why I didn’t get the jury summons for next week either. The court house is just 2 miles from here.

    Well, I was only being half-serious. I do lots of shipping too, mostly media mail in my personal life. That takes a week or less to anywhere in the lower 48, thanks to Tulsa’s central location. The state’s general aversion to reading material may be helping to expel it faster. At work, we ship pallets, crates, boxes of all sizes, all over the country; nothing takes 8 days to get anywhere on any carrier, even standard ground economy cheapo shipping.

    As for Orly’s problem, I say either 1) Orly was involved, she got the address wrong, and she lucky it arrived at all, or 2) she’s actually being impeded.

    As for the serious half, a slew of postal sorting centers are being closed, including the one in Tulsa. Now all 1st class mail in Tulsa will be sent to OKC for processing, then back to Tulsa. If I mail something to my neighbor, it will travel 200+ miles and take 2-3 days. As my advice for Orly …. if it’s important, i should hand-deliver it.

  11. avatar
    Monkey Boy March 15, 2012 at 7:26 am #

    “thank God for Mississippi.”

    As one that grew up in SC, I offer the slight correction: “Thank God for Mississippi and Arkansas.”