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Is Ma a racist?

Orly Taitz media blasted out this email with the subject:

Obama-Nazis, brown shirts in the media attack me by calling ma a racist and a clansman. Please, contact all the media outlets, particularly in DC, show them all the evidence and help me fight back.

Are you a racist? Test your biases here at Harvard’s “Project Implicit.” I took this Implicit Association Test, and it told me: “Your data suggest a strong automatic preference for White People compared to Black People.” That may be true given how I was raised, but I think the test is a crock. They bias the results by the order that they present the categories.

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32 Responses to Is Ma a racist?

  1. avatar
    JRC February 13, 2013 at 2:23 am #

    I took it, and it said…

    Your data suggest little to no automatic preference between White People and Black People.

  2. avatar
    JRC February 13, 2013 at 2:26 am #

    I will say that I don’t see the scientific value of the test. So I agree that I’m skeptical of the whole thing, but not going to say a crock.

  3. avatar
    JRC February 13, 2013 at 2:30 am #

    Also I do agree that they bias the results. It’s just hand-eye coordination with the pictures and the words. At least that’s how I saw it.

  4. avatar
    Majority Will February 13, 2013 at 3:06 am #

    “Your Result
    Your data suggest a slight automatic preference for African American compared to European American.”

  5. avatar
    Arthur February 13, 2013 at 3:12 am #

    “Your data suggest little or no difference in your automatic preference between the Red creatures and the Purple creatures.” Da Fawk?! Did I miss a step?

  6. avatar
    Majority Will February 13, 2013 at 3:23 am #

    Arthur:
    “Your data suggest little or no difference in your automatic preference between the Red creatures and the Purple creatures.”Da Fawk?!Did I miss a step?

    I like turtles.

  7. avatar
    El Diable Negro February 13, 2013 at 7:33 am #

    “Your data suggest little or no difference in your automatic preference between the Red creatures and the Purple creatures.”

    I got the same result Arthur

  8. avatar
    Bob February 13, 2013 at 8:39 am #

    Orly is wearing a white hood in the photo she posted of herself on her blog:

    http://www.orlytaitzesq.com/?p=389973#respond

  9. avatar
    Andrew Vrba, PmG February 13, 2013 at 9:54 am #

    “Your data suggest a slight automatic preference for Klingon-Americans compared to Romulan-Americans.” Weird.

  10. avatar
    Thomas Brown February 13, 2013 at 10:16 am #

    Majority Will: I like turtles.

    Nice Tosh reference.

  11. avatar
    Northland10 February 13, 2013 at 10:18 am #

    Hmm.. why might some have concerns about Orly and bigotry? Could it be:

    Orly says: another concern is lack of signatures. I talked to several clerks: Sevgil Tekali, she looks Turkish to me and James Baldin, and African-American man. they work in the front in the clerk’s office in the Supreme Court.

    Snip

    James Baldin went to talk to the back office. I saw three African -American men there. He came back and said that he checked and I am not allowed to see the signature.

    Warning: http://www.orlytaitzesq.com/?p=389817

    Is this the “all the evidence” to which she speaks?

  12. avatar
    Lupin February 13, 2013 at 12:05 pm #

    Last year, the GOP sent Bobby Jindal to be their wickerman, er, I mean, responder to the State of the Union speech. This year they burned Marco Rubio.

    Is this a part of a plan, or merely incompetence?

  13. avatar
    sfjeff February 13, 2013 at 12:37 pm #

    JRC: I will say that I don’t see the scientific value of the test. So I agree that I’m skeptical of the whole thing, but not going to say a crock.

    I first learned about this test in one of Malcolm Gladwell’s books- Blink maybe?

    From what I remember about it, the test uses reaction time to measure preferences- but- and this is the important part that is explained by Malcolm Gladwell- this doesn’t measure “Prejudice’- it measure unconscous preferences.

    For instance- I have a friend who self identifies as a ‘native American’- and lo and behold- her test showed a preference towards ‘native Americans.

    One of the things that the test has revealed is that many African Americans associate African American negatively- likely the result of how African Americans are portrayed in popular culture.

    If you have a chance to read up on it more, I think you will be more impressed by the science of the test- it tries to get past people’s assumptions about themselves.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blink_(book)

  14. avatar
    sfjeff February 13, 2013 at 12:40 pm #

    Lupin: Last year, the GOP sent Bobby Jindal to be their wickerman, er, I mean, responder to the State of the Union speech. This year they burned Marco Rubio.Is this a part of a plan, or merely incompetence?

    I was yawning listening to Rubio. I thought he was supposed to be a rising star?

    If the Republicans hadn’t all turned against him for the audacity of sharing a helicopter with Obama, Gov Christie would have been a far more interesting response.

  15. avatar
    The Magic M February 13, 2013 at 1:48 pm #

    Lupin: Is this a part of a plan, or merely incompetence?

    If you plan to appeal to birthers, you don’t want a candidate that birthers will clearly reject.

  16. avatar
    JPotter February 13, 2013 at 1:57 pm #

    sfjeff: I thought he was supposed to be a rising star?

    That’s the media line. I’m not buying. He would have fit right in with the last joke of a cycle. “No, really, who’s the real candidate?”

    I am assuming (and probably assuming too much….) that the Reds will pony up more serious candidates in 2016, as the race will be wide open, no incumbent. The party establishment and all the serious names took a pass this in 2012. The few that dipped their toes in dropped out early. It didn’t take too much insight to see that the level of crazy needed to wint the Red nomination last year would never sell in the general. Wiser pols didn’t dive into that pool.

    It was quite a freak show, but please, not another.

  17. avatar
    ObiWanCannoli February 13, 2013 at 8:21 pm #

    What surprises me the most in all this is the complete silence from her family. Don’t her husband and sons care about their professional life? They let this woman run around the country and make a fool out of herself. Just for her family’s sake, you would think she will give up her insane court filings. If this was my family, I would moved the court to involuntarily commit her to a mental asylum. If not, at the least, I would’ve change my last name.

    I think her husband owns a software company. There is no doubt his customers are very sensitive to Orly’s activities. Surely, the thought of a group going after his customers for Orly’s xenophobic rants and the borderline terrorist activities she asks her FMs to commit must have crossed his mind many times. I have a feeling he is terrified to even bring up the dreaded word “divorce”. She will take him to the cleaners just by filing countless frivolous law suites. I truly feel sorry for her family.

  18. avatar
    ZixiOfIx February 14, 2013 at 1:38 am #

    Lupin:
    Last year, the GOP sent Bobby Jindal to be their wickerman, er, I mean, responder to the State of the Union speech.This year they burned Marco Rubio.

    Is this a part of a plan, or merely incompetence?

    Why can’t it be both?

  19. avatar
    Paul Pieniezny February 14, 2013 at 2:26 am #

    If it’s any consolation, Doc, I’ve got the same result and as an Anglican, I’ve got a lot of African friends.

  20. avatar
    Majority Will February 15, 2013 at 11:10 am #

    “Could we all be a little bit ‘birther’?” – Ali Vitali

    (excerpt) How well do we know ourselves? And more importantly, how do we know what’s affecting our judgments and biases? The Cycle got a little existential Tuesday afternoon when the hosts talked to Dr. Mahzarin Banaji.

    Her new book “Blind Spot” says that our attitudes towards things like race, gender, sexuality, age, and politics are formed by “mindbugs”: learned habits that impair the brain’s ability to perceive things as they truly are. Banaji says that culture and societal interactions inform what our minds know. She gives the example that “I know that more women than men are nurses. I know that more men than women are neurosurgeons. That’s not something I was born knowing; that’s something I have come to learn through life and through experience.”

    Dr. Banaji’s quest for where our bias comes from may have turned up where birther sympathies come from. Research found that “many of us carry a very strong association between American and white.” And this implicit bias could inform the way that some people vote. If we extend this line of thought, and function under the premise that to be American is to be white, than we may be more inclined to vote for McCain over Obama or Mitt Romney over Obama.

    http://tv.msnbc.com/2013/02/12/could-we-all-a-be-little-bit-birther/

  21. avatar
    Keith February 15, 2013 at 4:55 pm #

    Majority Will: Her new book “Blind Spot” says that our attitudes towards things like race, gender, sexuality, age, and politics are formed by “mindbugs”: learned habits that impair the brain’s ability to perceive things as they truly are. Banaji says that culture and societal interactions inform what our minds know.

    Why invent a new term for something that has been known about for decades?

    There is a perfectly good word for this phenomenon: “fnord”.

    The fact that it was proposed in a fantasy (or is it?) novel doesn’t make the idea any less relevant.

  22. avatar
    Paul Pieniezny February 15, 2013 at 5:15 pm #

    ObiWanCannoli: I have a feeling he is terrified to even bring up the dreaded word “divorce”. She will take him to the cleaners just by filing countless frivolous law suites. I truly feel sorry for her family.

    While it (anything to do with Orly’s family, who as far as we know, could be innocent bystanders as far as birfery is concerned) is out of the scope of this blog – I doubt very much that Orly would be able to take anyone to the cleaners by filing frivolous law suits. She is far too incompetent a lawyer for that. Most of the body of the pleadings she is filing against Obama are still copy pastes from Berg and Cell3. Well, I mean the comprehensible part of it.

    Orly’s husband real problem is California’s community property laws. Of course, if he had any sense at all, before the marriage he located most of his capital outside the USA. Latvia, being his native country, would be a prime candidate to keep what he had before the marriage from the clutches of his wife. Any property purchased with money from that separate property, would be separate property too – if he can prove so.

    Now community property law is a major part of the California Bar exam – nevertheless, we all expect Orly to make a mess of it and just file frivolous suits. Funny or not?

  23. avatar
    Majority Will February 15, 2013 at 7:30 pm #

    Keith: Why invent a new term for something that has been known about for decades?

    There is a perfectly good word for this phenomenon: “fnord”.

    The fact that it was proposed in a fantasy (or is it?) novel doesn’t make the idea any less relevant.

    Fnord is the lint in the navel of the mites that eat the lint in the navel of the mites that eat the lint in Fnord’s navel.

  24. avatar
    Keith February 16, 2013 at 12:14 am #

    Majority Will: Fnord is the lint in the navel of the mites that eat the lint in the navel of the mites that eat the lint in Fnord’s navel.

    I should have included a link to the word’s description, I suppose.

    Wikipedia: Fnord

    Urban Dictionary: Fnord

  25. avatar
    Dr. Conspiracy February 16, 2013 at 7:42 am #

    Uhhh, your sentence doesn’t have a subject.

    Majority Will: Fnord is the lint in the navel of the mites that eat the lint in the navel of the mites that eat the lint in Fnord’s navel.

  26. avatar
    Majority Will February 16, 2013 at 12:43 pm #

    Dr. Conspiracy:
    Uhhh, your sentence doesn’t have a subject.

    That’s fnord.

  27. avatar
    Thomas Brown February 16, 2013 at 6:25 pm #

    Keith: Why invent a new term for something that has been known about for decades?

    There is a perfectly good word for this phenomenon: “fnord”.

    The fact that it was proposed in a fantasy (or is it?) novel doesn’t make the idea any less relevant.

    Like “wampeters, foma, and granfaloons.” Very useful neologisms all.

  28. avatar
    justlw February 17, 2013 at 12:10 am #

    Dr. Conspiracy:
    Uhhh, your sentence doesn’t have a subject.

    I don’t see what you didn’t do there.

  29. avatar
    Dr. Conspiracy February 17, 2013 at 8:24 am #

    That’s what?

    Majority Will: That’s fnord.

  30. avatar
    Majority Will February 17, 2013 at 9:41 am #

    Dr. Conspiracy:
    That’s what?

    Now you’ve got it!

    And if you wish to study a granfalloon, just remove the skin of a toy balloon.

  31. avatar
    Keith February 17, 2013 at 6:14 pm #

    The message is only visible to the enlightened

  32. avatar
    RoadScholar February 17, 2013 at 6:50 pm #

    Majority Will: Now you’ve got it!

    And if you wish to study a granfalloon, just remove the skin of a toy balloon.

    A “wampeter” is an object around which the lives of many otherwise unrelated people may revolve. The Holy Grail would be a case in point. “Foma” are harmless untruths, intended to comfort simple souls. An example: “Prosperity is just around the corner.” A “granfalloon” is a proud and meaningless association of human beings.