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NPR President resigns

Just minutes ago, National Public Radio reported that NPR CEO and President Vivian Schiller has resigned.

This follows yesterday’s news that then-NPR fundraiser Ron Schiller (no relation) was videotaped slamming conservatives and questioning whether NPR needs federal funding during a lunch with men posing as members of a Muslim organization (they were working with political activist James O’Keefe on a “sting.”)

NPR

As part of that “sting” video, an NPR executive compares those who doubt Barack Obama’s birthplace to those who believe “the world is flat.”

NPR said that Ron Schiller’s remarks (which have been described as fitting the Conservative stereotype of an NPR executive) “could not have come at a worse time” as federal funding for public broadcasting has come under fire by conservatives in Congress.

NPR receives about 2% of its budget directly from federal funds, but local stations benefit significantly from grants from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. Member station fees for programming are the largest source of NPR funding.

Dr. Conspiracy has been a member of the  ETV Endowment of South Carolina for over 20 years.

12 Responses to NPR President resigns

  1. avatar
    JoZeppy March 9, 2011 at 11:11 am #

    Would that “Conservative seterotype of an NPR executive” be that he part of the reality based community?

  2. avatar
    Daniel March 9, 2011 at 11:12 am #

    There are times when I’m embarrassed to be a Republican.

  3. avatar
    Wile E. March 9, 2011 at 11:55 am #

    And now….a press release from Ron Schiller’s former next gig:

    Ron Schiller has informed us that, in light of the controversy surrounding his recent statements, he does not feel that it’s in the best interests of the Aspen Institute for him to come work here.

  4. avatar
    misha March 9, 2011 at 12:10 pm #

    Daniel: There are times when I’m embarrassed to be a Republican.

    Nelson Rockefeller is weeping.

  5. avatar
    elid March 9, 2011 at 3:11 pm #

    My family was Republican for generations, to the point that I actually felt guilty when I registered as a Democrat in the late 1980s. It used to be an honorable party.

    Sad.

  6. avatar
    Dave March 9, 2011 at 5:27 pm #

    The impression I get after attempting to piece together the news reports is that the NPR board is dominated by representatives of those member stations that depend heavily on Federal funding. And that their overriding concern is to never have anybody mad at them, so the Federal funding will not become politically controversial.
    I’d say that if this is the kind of crappy governance NPR has, maybe they should go out of the news business. How can you run a news organization when the board just wants them to avoid offending anyone?

  7. avatar
    Slartibartfast March 9, 2011 at 6:06 pm #

    I think James O’Keefe is a grotesque individual.

    (Sorry, just needed to get that off my chest)

  8. avatar
    Dr. Kenneth Noisewater (Bob Ross) March 9, 2011 at 6:36 pm #

    Slartibartfast:
    I think James O’Keefe is a grotesque individual.

    (Sorry, just needed to get that off my chest)

    I’m in agreement he’s a scumbag. He comes from a well to do family and goes about trying to destroy any and all support systems the poor have.

  9. avatar
    Dave March 9, 2011 at 6:56 pm #

    On the subject of O’Keefe, there’s nothing more distasteful than rich kids’ sense of entitlement toward their parents’ wealth.

  10. avatar
    misha March 9, 2011 at 7:49 pm #

    Dave: On the subject of O’Keefe, there’s nothing more distasteful than rich kids’ sense of entitlement toward their parents’ wealth.

    I saw the same thing in college. The wealthy students were snobbish and disdainful of those who got financial aid. The YAF – Young Americans for Freedom, Buckley’s bunch – actually circulated a petition to expel students receiving financial assistance, other than loans which had to be paid back.

    It was the sort of ‘welfare queen’ libel.

    I worked for someone like that in NY. He wanted his son to go to optometry school, but the kid had a ‘C’ average. He told me he made a substantial contribution to a school’s endowment, and they admitted his son. The kid failed out the first semester. He then went to work at the shop, and was miserable to the employees.

    A first class snob.

  11. avatar
    aarrgghh March 9, 2011 at 8:33 pm #

    i’ve posted this here before and it bears repeating, and not just because it’s one of my favorite anecdotes:

    So how did [Bill Kristol] end up with such a sweet gig? (Especially given that the Times already employed an incomparably more talented conservative columnist in the person of David Brooks.)

    The answer goes back to Farley’s observation about the extreme nepotism of the contemporary right-wing media machine. Kristol may be an utter mediocrity, but he’s an extraordinarily well-connected utter mediocrity. (Indeed, as this column went to press it was announced that the Washington Post Writers Group had hired Kristol.)

    Which brings me to this charming vignette, courtesy of blog commenter Harry Hopkins:

    “I remember back in the late 1990s, when Ira Katznelson, an eminent political scientist at Columbia, came to deliver a guest lecture. Prof. Katznelson described a lunch he had with Irving Kristol during the first Bush administration.

    “The talk turned to William Kristol, then Dan Quayle’s chief of staff, and how he got his start in politics. Irving recalled how he talked to his friend Harvey Mansfield at Harvard, who secured William a place there as both an undergrad and graduate student; how he talked to Pat Moynihan, then Nixon’s domestic policy adviser, and got William an internship at the White House; how he talked to friends at the RNC [Republican National Committee] and secured a job for William after he got his Harvard Ph.D.; and how he arranged with still more friends for William to teach at Penn and the Kennedy School of Government.

    “With that, Prof. Katznelson recalled, he then asked Irving what he thought of affirmative action. I oppose it,’ Irving replied. It subverts meritocracy.’ “

    [rimshot]

  12. avatar
    misha March 9, 2011 at 8:55 pm #

    aarrgghh: “With that, Prof. Katznelson recalled, he then asked Irving what he thought of affirmative action. I oppose it,’ Irving replied. It subverts meritocracy.’ “

    How did Jonah Goldberg get his gig at National Review? His mother, Lucianne, got it for him.

    He’s a first class snob. What he writes drips with contempt.