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Time management

I think Orly Taitz needs to work on time management. I read the transcript of her court appearance in Mississippi last week, and she didn’t seem prepared. She either didn’t read or didn’t pay enough attention to remember the cases cited against her by the Secretary of State and and the Mississippi Democratic Party. It was rather embarrassing as the judge repeatedly asked her about things with which she should have been familiar only to hear her say, “I don’t recall.” She asked the court for 3 weeks to serve the new defendants in the case and three weeks to respond to Defense motions (to be served  concurrently), thereby extending the time that the case could be heard until after the election.

Now we see that Taitz has done the same thing in Kansas, reports the Topeka Capital Journal. Again she has asked for 21 days to respond to Defense motions, and with 14 days allowed for the Defendants to respond, any court action is again past the election.

Add to those two, the massive suit in California with 30 defendants (she thinks it’s a problem answering motions from just 2 defendants!) Judd v. Obama plus that PPACA challenge in Texas, Taitz v. Sebelius. I don’t know how many more.

Taitz seems to measure success by how many lawsuits she has filed, not how many she has won. As we say in the United States, she has bitten off more than she can chew. Maybe she should hire a lawyer.

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14 Responses to Time management

  1. avatar
    jayHG October 3, 2012 at 3:53 am #

    I think I’ve figured out how Orly’s thinks the law works. She files a lawsuit (improperly, but details, details), everyone shows up In court and the judge declares that she, Orly, is the winner. Then, everyone does whatever she says in her lawsuit. The End.

    I’m entirely seriously. Nothing else makes sense. Otherwise, she’d understand that one goes to court, puts their best case forward and SOMETIMES they win – the court/judge/jury agrees with them – and sometimes not.

    Otherwise, she’s just a person who needs someone who loves her to get her to a doctor.

  2. avatar
    RuhRoh October 3, 2012 at 6:35 am #

    I think there’s some truth to the idea that she thinks she should win simply because she showed up and made outrageous claims.

    But her inability to learn from even one of her many, many mistakes and her constant delaying underscores that her “legal crusade” is about nothing more than publicity.

  3. avatar
    Majority Will October 3, 2012 at 8:04 am #

    RuhRoh: But her inability to learn from even one of her many, many mistakes and her constant delaying underscores that her “legal crusade” is about nothing more than publicity.

    Narcissism.

  4. avatar
    Dr. Conspiracy October 3, 2012 at 8:30 am #

    I think it somehow significant that when Orly herself was sued (Liberi v. Taitz) she hired a lawyer. (Perhaps since her husband was also named, he insisted.)

  5. avatar
    Bob October 3, 2012 at 8:50 am #

    The drama queen can continue to pretend that the issue hasn’t been resolved.

  6. avatar
    GeorgetownJD October 3, 2012 at 8:52 am #

    On the morning of September 24, I observed Taitz as she sat in the dining room of the hotel intensely “preparing” for the hearing. I’ve no doubt that she “prepares” for her oral arguments. The problem is, she practices her talking points rather than reading (and re-reading and familiarizing herself with) the motions at hand and fails to prepare any argument that addresses the legal arguments.

    Based on her demeanor in the courtroom when Judge Wingate asked her about specific cases and statutes and Mississippi appellate rule 5F, she was totally taken aback at the questions. Literally gobsmacked by questions about fundamental law. Her responses to the court were meek, in contrast to her otherwise aggressive (combative?) approach to argument. It was clear that if she had ever read those authorities (all cited by the defendants in their motions for JOP), no effort was made to go back and review them before the hearing, because she expressed her erroneous belief that defense counsel was raising “new” argument. She certainly didn’t have copies of the cases cited at hand — something any competent attorney would have included in his/her trial notebook.

  7. avatar
    RuhRoh October 3, 2012 at 9:14 am #

    I don’t think she’d even know how to find the cited cases. Whenever she wants to find a case, she just posts a command to her idiot followers to find it for her.

    In fact, she doesn’t even have contact information for her own witnesses! She recently posted a request on her blog that her idiot followers supply her with a complete list of witnesses and their contact information. Amazing.

  8. avatar
    Dr. Conspiracy October 3, 2012 at 10:07 am #

    I think this goes to the inadequacy of the on-line law school model.

    GeorgetownJD: She certainly didn’t have copies of the cases cited at hand — something any competent attorney would have included in his/her trial notebook.

  9. avatar
    bob October 3, 2012 at 12:15 pm #

    Dr. Conspiracy:
    I think it somehow significant that when Orly herself was sued (Liberi v. Taitz) she hired a lawyer. (Perhaps since her husband was also named, he insisted.)

    Taitz is also counsel in that case. Which is presently in both the district court and 9th Circuit. (The Taitzes’ lawyer was likely provided by their insurance company.)

    In addition to the cases listed in the main article, Taitz is also litigating in Indiana. There’s also a case in the Orange County courts concerning (mainly) her loss in the Senate primary election.

    Last year Taitz successfully(!) sued some former tenants in a lease-breach case, but the case is now in the bankruptcy court.

    And Taitz has an upcoming trial for (yet another) speeding ticket.

  10. avatar
    Thrifty October 3, 2012 at 1:17 pm #

    No, I think Orly understands exactly how it works. It’s just that she thinks that her case is bulletproof and her facts are solid. She clearly believes that the evidence of forgery is overwhelming and incontrovertible. She should win because she has this incontrovertible evidence, not because she shows up.

    jayHG:
    I think I’ve figured out how Orly’s thinks the law works.She files a lawsuit (improperly, but details, details), everyone shows up In court and the judge declares that she, Orly, is the winner. Then, everyone does whatever she says in her lawsuit. The End.

    I’m entirely seriously. Nothing else makes sense. Otherwise, she’d understand that one goes to court, puts their best case forward and SOMETIMES they win – the court/judge/jury agrees with them – and sometimes not.

    Otherwise, she’s just a person who needs someone who loves her to get her to a doctor.

  11. avatar
    John Potter October 3, 2012 at 6:51 pm #

    Orly never changes, she just gets older.

  12. avatar
    The Magic M October 4, 2012 at 9:20 am #

    Thrifty: She clearly believes that the evidence of forgery is overwhelming and incontrovertible.

    Yes, but she also believes that all defects in her cases should be cured by the fact that it is “a matter of national security”.
    She thinks that because she is questioning the credentials of the President, she gets more leeway – as in “if you were right, it would be a catastrophe, therefore we will make absolutely sure you are not right and grant you any discovery you want”.

    She doesn’t understand a court does not work like that. Whether you’re alleging your neighbour owes you $50 or you’re alleging the guy with the nuclear codes is an illegal alien and foreign agent, your facts and evidence need to be rock solid.
    That’s why she’s always asking for a “special prosecutor” to be installed.

    And who can blame her, Clinton was investigated for potentially banging his intern, so she must think allegations like hers deserve a proper investigation all the more.

  13. avatar
    bob j October 4, 2012 at 11:25 pm #

    Thrifty: She clearly believes that the evidence of forgery is overwhelming and incontrovertible.

    Will there come a lawsuit in which Orly names herself as a defendant? She has all the proof of a criminal enterprise( in her mind), yet she will not take it to the police or a D.A for a criminal investigation. Doesn’t that make her complicit in the Obamaforgerygate?

  14. avatar
    The Magic M October 5, 2012 at 7:29 am #

    bob j: Will there come a lawsuit in which Orly names herself as a defendant?

    Actually, I’m surprised birthers haven’t yet staged a (mock or real) trial in which one of them claims to be the forger of Obama’s BC and has himself ruled guilty…